A second chance at life in Malawi

Being one of the poorest countries in the world, Malawi presents so many challenges to the people from there.

Challenges that those of us who have grown up in the Global North probably couldn’t even fathom.

And to add to the challenges that the country faces because of the poverty, the pandemic has pushed the children’s rights movement back by at least 30 years. If not more.

Life is not easy.

But there is hope. And that hope comes in the form of Chance4Change. Who we have worked with a few times over the years.

Chance4Change was established in 2011 and the organization believes that all young people have the right to be active citizens and equal members of society.

Today I speak with Grace Tionge Waluza, who has been with Chance4Change since 2013 in many capacities, before taking up her post as Country Director.

Today she talks to us about the many challenges the country faces, what they are doing to support the young people, and how TIE will play an important part in providing even more hope.

And you can be a part of it.

So grab your favorite beverage. Or throw on those running shoes and here is a window to Malawi. And how women and girls are getting a second chance at life.

00:00:02:04 – 00:00:27:03
Philippa White
Welcome to the show, where we unearth new ways of looking at ever evolving light around the world. Seen from a number of different industries, cultures and backgrounds. But there’s one thing that unites everyone I speak to. They all want to do their part to make the world better in their own unique ways. It’s a uniting passion. Whether they’re from the commercial world, third sector or public sector from the Global North or the global south.

00:00:27:15 – 00:00:49:20
Philippa White
My name is Philippa White and welcome to TIE Unearthed. Hello everyone. Philippa White here and welcome to episode 30 of TIE Unearthed. Today I’m speaking with Grace Waluza, Malawi Country Director of Chance for Change. We’ve worked with Chance for Change a couple of times over the years, and I’ve always felt really passionate about the work the organization does.

00:00:50:01 – 00:01:11:11
Philippa White
Being one of the poorest countries in the world, Malawi presents so many challenges to the people from their challenges that those of us who have grown up in the Global North probably couldn’t even fathom. Chance for Change was established in 2011 by leading professionals in the field of youth development, with considerable experience in other organizations, including Venture, Trust and Save the Children.

00:01:12:01 – 00:01:48:21
Philippa White
The organization believes that all young people have the right to be active citizens and equal members of society. Grace has been with chance for change since 2013 in many capacities before taking a proposal as country director. She provides leadership and strategic direction and is also responsible for maintaining partnerships, recruitment and management of staff, mentoring and training. To quote grace, I love working with young people as they hold such promise and the idea that I might be able to guide them on their journey or be part of it in any way is more fulfilling than anything else I could imagine myself doing.

00:01:49:04 – 00:02:03:03
Philippa White
So grab your favorite beverage or throw in those running shoes. And here is an inspiring chat with Grace. Hi, Grace. It’s so exciting to have you with us today. Thank you so much for joining us.

00:02:03:09 – 00:02:10:22
Grace
Oh, you’re welcome. Welcome. Philippa, I’m so happy to have you guys here today. Tonight? Yes.

00:02:10:24 – 00:02:37:02
Philippa White
Yeah, tonight. Exactly. I know you’re 5 hours ahead. So Grace is in Malawi and we are going to be talking about the extraordinary work that she and chance for change do in Malawi. So perhaps we can kick off with you telling our listeners, Grace, about you a little bit, about you actually your background, and then you can talk about Chance for Change and why it was set up.

00:02:37:11 – 00:02:43:07
Grace
So, yeah, my name is Grace Waluza. I’m turning 40 the next month.

00:02:43:14 – 00:02:44:16
Philippa White
Oh, happy birthday.

00:02:44:19 – 00:03:14:17
Grace
Thank you. Thank you. Yeah. So I’m just very passionate about young people. I am coming from Malawi. As you know, Malawi is one of the poorest countries. I joined the youth work probably in 20 in the year 2010. Yeah. When I was one of the people that was heading a small group of young boys and girls which were doing drama and all that.

00:03:15:00 – 00:03:58:24
Grace
And then in 2013 is when I joined Chance for Change. It was an organization. It is an organization established in 2011 by Greg Barton and Andy Ashworth. These are the guys from the UK. So when they came to Malawi they said they wanted to work with the youth, especially in the areas of bringing in the youth that have a complicated background, so to say so that they are given another chance to realize who they are and to also realize that they’re all they are a global citizens and they can do better in life, in church, helping them to become adults and responsible adults.

00:03:59:22 – 00:04:26:19
Grace
So that’s when I had a chance for change. And being a person working with young people, I have enjoyed my work and I continue to enjoy it, enjoying it a lot. I think one of the things that makes me feel very, very good about everything that we do, not just watch change, is the fact that we are trying to help young people that are that have the complicated background.

00:04:26:19 – 00:04:51:21
Grace
So obviously legacy have another chance, but also realize that they can do better in life, but also they can lead in any other way or any other platforms. But also the fact that I am I am like I have the chance to share what if I have, but also to have the chance to meet with them. I learn a lot from them.

00:04:52:08 – 00:05:04:20
Grace
Most of the times I think young people had a very bright and good future also. So I feel very, very motivated all the time when I’m among them.

00:05:05:13 – 00:05:14:11
Philippa White
I can imagine. And just if you could explain a little bit about Andy and Greg, so Chance for Change started when.

00:05:15:21 – 00:05:19:07
Grace
In 2011, A Chance for Change started in 2011.

00:05:19:15 – 00:05:31:08
Philippa White
2011, yeah. So in 2011 and they is it just in Malawi or does chance for change? I’m pretty sure that there are other countries that chance for change are based on. Is that correct?

00:05:31:09 – 00:05:54:24
Grace
Yes, it is. So Chance for Change started in 2011 by Greg Barton and the Ashley. So just to say a little bit about Andy and great because I might not know much about Greg, but with Andy because at least we have stayed together for quite some time because he was in Malawi for, for the past should be for four years.

00:05:55:05 – 00:06:04:21
Grace
Yeah. So he just left. Now he’s back in, in the UK but I know that and it was a kid during her childhood so.

00:06:04:22 – 00:06:05:16
Philippa White
Really.

00:06:05:17 – 00:06:06:03
Grace
Yes.

00:06:06:09 – 00:06:09:09
Philippa White
I did not know that. If you bring that to life. I didn’t know that.

00:06:09:12 – 00:06:34:10
Grace
Yes. Yes. So he has he has been thinking about it a lot and he has worked with a lot of them back in the UK when he visited Malawi, he had all those feelings and and and the love of Malawi itself and he thought that maybe we should come one day. And Rich in Malawi with the people and all that, having him coming from the background of being in the street.

00:06:34:11 – 00:07:01:08
Grace
So I think when he came to Malawi, he managed to visit a few more good deeds as well as kids in Italy and people in various prisons and all that. So that’s when they said, No, I think we have to do something with Malawi and they are the ones that made our first funding proposal and lucky enough it passed and then we had the funding from the Scottish Government.

00:07:01:08 – 00:07:23:19
Grace
But then it wasn’t just in Malawi. They also went to do the very same thing to Nepal and in and in the UK too. So basically in the UK they were also working with homeless people, homeless young people I should say. And the very same thing in Nepal. And then they came to Malawi and.

00:07:23:20 – 00:07:52:14
Philippa White
They came to Malawi. And so just if you could bring to life just in a little bit more detail, because I think it’s fascinating thing we’ve worked with Chance to Change a couple of times and obviously we’re going to be working with you again in September. But just to bring to life when you’re talking about the prisons and then you you talk about a second chance at life, perhaps you could help us understand the situation in your part of the world.

00:07:52:14 – 00:08:20:23
Philippa White
You know, what are some of the challenges that you face? And and as a result, what is Chance for Change doing to help the young people in so many different ways that you do it? But can you paint the picture just for the listeners who really won’t understand the challenges that you face there, both from the point of view of the the fact that you work with people who have been in prison and why they’re in prison and what what that is about.

00:08:20:23 – 00:08:27:08
Philippa White
And then perhaps you can help bring to life some of the challenges that are related to the to the project that we’re going to be working on in September.

00:08:27:09 – 00:08:50:05
Grace
Like I said, Malawi is one of the poorest country countries in Africa with the poverty levels that we have right now. We also faced so many challenges in that is being, for instance, food itself, shelter and all the basic, basic needs, basic needs that one would want to have most need to challenge, to find, or to have. In Malawi.

00:08:50:11 – 00:09:22:01
Grace
Because of that, young people are most, most mostly vulnerable because, you know, we are young people already and we are coming from poor families and or that maybe our fathers, our mothers, and they already provide enough for us or to provide at all for us. And the only thing that’s there might be something that’s the maybe that will take you to prison, for instance, or something that will lead you to become more vulnerable.

00:09:22:01 – 00:09:43:11
Grace
For instance, that’s in the girls. But so in this case, I’m thinking about the two projects that we take a chance, which, you know, we have two projects. The first project is the one that is called Alternative to Custody. This one, we work with the young people, mostly young boys, because it’s not all the time that we have girls in prisons, but young people that I represent.

00:09:43:21 – 00:10:04:11
Grace
Yeah. So as a, as they are serving their sentences, which hand in hand with the, the judicial fist of what we do assessments. So for instance what happens is at a court is a young person that’s been maybe convicted and then they are judged to say maybe they’ve given a sentence and say, okay, they need to go and do this.

00:10:04:11 – 00:10:29:00
Grace
And this is said in prison. That’s a juvenile center. And then already we do not have enough in Malawi juvenile centers with we find that as they are able to go and so this emphasis as and they judge would also assist them if he’s spoken for his sentence maybe he can also address with the crime. So they say, okay, I think we recommend this person to go to chance.

00:10:29:12 – 00:10:50:12
Grace
We should go we should at least inform test, which is that there’s this boy with this crime. Just what judge goes to do the assessments. But as just we’re just doing the assessment or we need to see from that particular boys the willingness to to change and learn new things as we go. If we assess, we see that this there’s that willingness to change.

00:10:50:16 – 00:11:13:21
Grace
That’s when we give them a chance to say, okay, let’s let them come through our our center, our rehabilitation center. So as they are with us, the government is is pointing that this particular person is serving his sentence as we are giving him the interviews as as well as the vocational skills.

00:11:14:01 – 00:11:40:10
Philippa White
Okay, that’s interesting. So the so just just to recap, so these young people, they do something to get the attention of the judges, the judicial system, so they will steal something. Perhaps they need food or perhaps they need money. I remember reading in one of our past briefs, there’s a lot of children who also don’t even have parents because of the high rates of HIV in in Malawi.

00:11:40:10 – 00:12:04:21
Philippa White
So they might not even have parents. Or if they do, their parents don’t have money to provide for them in the way that they need to be provided for. So they go and steal and then they get the attention of the law. They almost go to jail. But instead of going to jail, they go to your as long as they show a desire to change and to be better, your center is recognized by the the judicial system.

00:12:05:03 – 00:12:18:17
Philippa White
They recognize it as a way for these young people to be reintroduced to society. And you provide them with the the skills and the the base to then to then go back into society. Is that correct?

00:12:18:17 – 00:12:20:01
Grace
Yes, it is correct.

00:12:20:04 – 00:12:25:14
Philippa White
And so talk to us about what you I mean, just from that point of view, what do you do with these young people?

00:12:25:20 – 00:12:30:23
Grace
So I would take you through what happens when a young person arrives. A chance, which is simple.

00:12:30:24 – 00:12:31:15
Philippa White
Yeah, please.

00:12:31:17 – 00:12:59:13
Grace
So when a boy arrives at the center, first of all, we assist. They are healthy. Are they okay? They not malnourished or do they have any other diseases? Because most of the time when they’re coming from jail or any other detention centers, they come with all sorts of diseases, I could imagine so. So if we assess that they do not have any, that’s when we we we now connect them with the rest of the group that’s already there.

00:13:00:03 – 00:13:30:00
Grace
But if we feel like there’s any other challenges, for instance, a disease or they are under malnourished. So we, we put them on a very separate, I should say, special diet. Well, so so that they get better. And then from from there we, we introduce them to all the trends that we have. So we have vocational skills like mechanics or the mechanics, but we also have bricklaying minus that we have plumbing.

00:13:30:09 – 00:13:32:24
Grace
So they do farming within the premises.

00:13:33:17 – 00:13:36:00
Philippa White
Great. Really? That’s great.

00:13:36:00 – 00:13:43:05
Grace
Yes, they are doing vegetables. We have different vegetables as well as poultry farming.

00:13:43:05 – 00:13:45:03
Philippa White
That’s fantastic. That’s really great.

00:13:45:08 – 00:14:17:22
Grace
So so when we introduced them, we introduced them to all of these trades just just so that they see what the best at or what they might be interested in. For instance, the benefits with the go for the family or the farming itself. Yes. And if they feel like I don’t think I like farming, maybe I should say bricklaying though contributing the second week and they would they feel like I maybe not here maybe they will mechanics they will go and train mechanics up until the very first three weeks.

00:14:17:22 – 00:14:44:20
Grace
And that’s when they will have their choice to say no, I think I’m better at mechanics and I want to do mechanics. And then that’s when we encourage them to go for mechanics. Okay. So as they are doing that, they are also going they are also undergoing the best based on the development skills as we are doing the counseling on a one on one sessions just to mentor them, make them also realize that what they did was not good, also help them to do to know that.

00:14:44:20 – 00:15:08:11
Grace
Okay, so if, if, if at some point the will something that happened to them will happen again, that means this is the life that they have chosen just to make them realize the consequences of whatever they’ve done, but also saying to help them to be to be responsible people. So yeah, that’s what we do for them. And we would give them all those for minimum should be six months.

00:15:08:11 – 00:15:43:03
Grace
But it also depends sometimes if we have other others that are difficult to maybe they have they find it a challenge to to progress to be progressed something do need some time to learn and then and then we don’t push them to say okay, no, your time is up. You need to be going this and that. No, we still give them a chance and sometimes they affect us to do with the health itself that maybe we might not we might not say No, they are they okay, they need to be going because maybe they still need to go meet the doctors and all that.

00:15:43:03 – 00:16:09:10
Grace
We don’t push them. We will still give them a chance to stay with us. So until we feel everything is all right and they go back to the community and become that young adult. But as we are doing that, we also make sure that we we already have gone to the communities where they come from just to assess if the community’s okay with that with them.

00:16:09:10 – 00:16:25:23
Grace
As of now, if for us, as if so it’s kind of a mediation. But sometimes we have had challenges to to say that, okay, we go to see a particular patients for many, then they’ll be like, no, no, no, no, we don’t need that particular medicine back here. And whenever they come back here, we’re going to build them alive.

00:16:25:23 – 00:16:43:13
Grace
So in that case, we already know that. Okay, it means the environment is not safe for them. We’ll ask if they have any other relatives anywhere else. That’s where we go again to assess if they say, yes, we can, we can accept, accept them. But in the community, that’s where we have to reintegrate them.

00:16:43:13 – 00:16:50:18
Philippa White
Well, and then I remember that was actually one of our past project was reintegration. But anyway, we won’t we won’t go there now.

00:16:51:03 – 00:17:23:04
Grace
The other project is the Girls Project. We’ve got this program project, the pioneers of change. So the pioneers of change is a project the way which is working with young people, young girls. And these are mostly victims of human trafficking and victims of sexual abuse. I should there’s also an element of modern day slavery in which mostly we want to give them the skills, also the passion and skills, and make them realize that the trafficking is real.

00:17:23:04 – 00:17:47:19
Grace
But also the abuse is is real also because most of it most of the times you find out that sometimes things that are happening among them as girls, they don’t realize that it’s it’s an abuse for them. They feel like they think it’s part of life, but we we consume to make them realize that, no, that’s not what is supposed to have to happen to them know.

00:17:48:07 – 00:18:05:20
Grace
And whenever anything of that nature happens to either them or their friends or anybody else that they know they should always go and report to either police see the US or the local chiefs. And so we see how best we help them.

00:18:06:06 – 00:18:27:20
Philippa White
Gosh. So from the point of view of the challenges, I mean, you touched on it just through the program that you have, but do you want to go into any more detail? I mean, what maybe bring it to light just a little bit more? So what are the ages? How has how has COVID impacted that?

00:18:28:06 – 00:18:53:08
Grace
So we work with these young girls as as young as nine years up to 17. But sometimes we find that we have other girls that are over 17, maybe up to four. We still need them because they still above know, maybe they’re a victims also. But they need also the the part of counseling that we always offer to them.

00:18:53:08 – 00:19:15:18
Grace
Yeah. So the challenge is, like I said earlier on, it’s all about the poverty that we have in Malawi. The other thing is the lack of knowledge itself that not even know that that’s an abuse. That knowledge is also very, very vital if we’re able to educate to the whole country that this is not only.

00:19:15:21 – 00:19:54:03
Philippa White
Can you talk to us about what you hope to get from the TY Accelerator project that we’re going to be doing with you in September, or just for our listeners to understand. So in the context of everything that Grace has talked about, the challenges of the the girls who are being abused or trafficked or whatever it might be, and trying to find a, a a second chance at life and a new opportunity for these young girls.

00:19:55:00 – 00:20:24:09
Philippa White
And I’ll I’d love you to bring that to life. Grace, in a second. But just again, for our listeners, the TIE Accelerator is a leadership program that gets leaders and professionals out of their comfort zone, out of their silos, provides them with an opportunity to shake things up a bit and kind of get that zest for life back by doing something different and doing something out of the norm, out of the sort of day to day.

00:20:24:13 – 00:20:49:19
Philippa White
And so we bring together a team of anywhere from 3 to 6 people from around the world, and they have an opportunity to work together to crack a real issue that is facing an organization and a community in a completely different part of the world. And so we are going to be working with Chance to Change in September.

00:20:49:19 – 00:21:17:00
Philippa White
And the brief is helping these young girls and helping them have a second chance at life. And we will be doing that with with this team of people. Perhaps you can bring to life what you hope to get from this experience, how you hope we can impact these young girls with the leadership of these professionals from around the world.

00:21:17:00 – 00:21:36:11
Grace
I’m hoping that working with Day in the next coming few months, our girls especially are going to benefit a lot. They are going to become even financially independent at some point, but also they’ll be able to create that financial independence even among themselves.

00:21:36:11 – 00:21:47:07
Philippa White
Perhaps you can. GRACE Could you bring to life? I think it would be really helpful just to help the listeners kind of understand how the program works with the young girls.

00:21:47:07 – 00:22:14:16
Grace
Also, the thing is, with these young girls, as we as they come to our center, the access, the psychosocial counseling, we also give them these personal development skills, like I said, but also among themselves. They teach each other the skills that they have as they come to our center. They got all these skills, but they go back to their community.

00:22:14:16 – 00:22:39:13
Grace
The very simple is that they are men. And so you can see that these are the places where even all these abuses or any other thing that happened to them happened. So they they get abused, right in with community and then they come just maybe for some hours to chat with us, to have that hope with us. And then in the end, they’ll go back to the very same communities.

00:22:40:01 – 00:23:01:23
Grace
So already we can see that there’s no security, there’s no hope. So know as much as the early morning of these skills and even as much as we walk the walk you need to go and report for this was some of this for us. This is sexual abuse as they happened. Right in their houses with the people that they call relatives.

00:23:01:24 – 00:23:26:04
Grace
They might even people they might be. Sometimes you find out that there’s a person that you you go as your bed and he’s the one that is actually abusing this particular kid. Yeah. And he’s the only breadwinner in the house. They did not have anybody, anybody that they might say, okay, I’ll go to my uncle and stay there or run away from this house or go and stay with my aunty somewhere else.

00:23:26:11 – 00:23:42:21
Grace
This is the only people these are the people that they also trust. These are the people that they believe in. And these are they are role models and they are doing this to them. And then they come to us, we give them all this counseling, and by the end of the day, they have to go back to the very same people.

00:23:43:02 – 00:24:11:19
Philippa White
That is what is so reassuring about the work that you’re doing. One, because you’re thinking about, okay, let’s try and give some kind of independence. The age of the young people. They can start to be independent and they can start to create a life for themselves to move away from the horrible situation that they have, waiting for them at home and develop some kind of independence to be able to go off on their own.

00:24:11:21 – 00:24:18:18
Philippa White
Am I right in thinking that that’s what you’re providing this age group in this group of young people?

00:24:18:20 – 00:24:51:09
Grace
Yes, yes, yes. Actually, we have two groups of young, young girls. So they are self that are very, very young. So most of the times we find out that these very, very small girls, maybe 13 or 14 above or below, they will always make a choice of going back to school. So what we do is encourage them. We load sometimes we provide with some exercise books, they go back to school, but also just going to see them, going to monitor what they are doing at school and and all that.

00:24:52:01 – 00:25:21:13
Grace
But this other kind of group that is maybe 17, 18, 16, and sometimes you find that they’re 15, 16, 17, but they already have kids and then teen mothers or in. And so these are the group that we believe we might give them a chance to do kind of an internship, give them that financial independence so that they are also able to look after the kids that they have and look after themselves.

00:25:21:21 – 00:25:50:11
Philippa White
Yeah, and it’s really exciting because the previous project that we worked on with Chloe from Octopus Investments, she she was based in Malawi with you guys and working with the young boys and 30 Rehabilitation and the Entrepreneurial Ship program and helped helped you work with you and George, if I’m not mistaken and, and helped to improve that entrepreneurial ship program, which was actually really fantastic already.

00:25:50:11 – 00:26:17:17
Philippa White
But I think just some of her experience just helped me to make it even better and then created the loan facility, which then helped create capital for them to actually turn some kind of business into something tangible and so the idea that we’ve together come to come up with was taking the learnings from that and implementing them for the this project for the Girls.

00:26:17:17 – 00:26:20:04
Philippa White
Is is that what you also have in mind?

00:26:20:06 – 00:26:41:18
Grace
Oh, yes, yes. Of course. Told me that this particular time is going to be a little bit different with with with this particular time. We said, okay, so guys, you do your business business plan and then we pitch. And so if I was doing well with the business plan and all that, those are the guys that we considered them with.

00:26:41:19 – 00:26:52:23
Grace
With some capital, some loans and all that. But this time around, I think it’s going to be groups that will create something as a group, and they do it together.

00:26:52:23 – 00:26:53:15
Philippa White
Oh, great.

00:26:54:02 – 00:27:18:11
Grace
As a group. And then if they want to pass it over to the other first, as if we say, okay, we’re in a group of ten or first five and then we have best five. If it’s a group of ten and we have best five or best to, we say, okay, the best two, we take them B aside and we create another one with these best, the best two.

00:27:18:19 – 00:27:34:20
Grace
So it means the in the best tool if the group is for ten, it means we are going to invite eight more to be in this particular group. So they they practice again with this one as champions and then like that and we pass it over and over. That was the plan.

00:27:35:07 – 00:28:06:03
Philippa White
Okay, that’s interesting. Yeah, that’s cool. And so basically what this project will be will be having a group of people come together and work with you and the beneficiaries to decide how to structure that and how to turn it into a sustainable model that will work with chance to change, but also significantly provide a second chance at life for these for these young girls who have so much potential, they just need some direction.

00:28:06:03 – 00:28:14:07
Philippa White
So, yeah, that’s really exciting. Tell me what as we’re coming to the end of the podcast, what keeps you up at night worrying.

00:28:14:10 – 00:28:24:12
Grace
The fact that these girls have to go back to the very simply, this very same people? That’s one of the things that keeps me. What is some.

00:28:24:24 – 00:28:25:08
Philippa White
Yeah.

00:28:25:24 – 00:28:48:00
Grace
If I had a chance to say, okay, maybe my house is big enough, I can just take them all things stay with them. That’s my dream. If, if we were to have somewhere, we will have them stay there with very good security and all that. And the second one is security. When I’m thinking about security, I’m talking about both sides.

00:28:48:11 – 00:29:14:21
Grace
So I’m looking at the girls themselves as the victims themselves, as well as as well as the members of staff. I wouldn’t know we had this scenario. One of the girls was abducted by the perpetrators. Yeah. And then the thinking was that they should she should go and testify in the court. And because she was very scared when they were asking her all sorts of questions and all that, she said, no, telling them that.

00:29:14:21 – 00:29:36:12
Grace
No, no, it’s just wasn’t she was helping me. And okay, this particular person know this this, this. You have the contacts? Yes, I have. What was the contract? And then she said given them because she was so scared where they took her to, we don’t even know. And then they started now making phone calls to us, giving us all those threats and all that, you know.

00:29:37:05 – 00:30:00:21
Grace
So sometimes even even as we are walking along the streets and all that, we we just have to be very careful and we encourage one another. We’ve got to deal with stuff members not to walk alone. Most of the time they should have friends, or at least they should have. If even if they are going for workshops and anywhere else, at least there should be three of them.

00:30:00:21 – 00:30:03:15
Philippa White
Gosh, that’s really the worry.

00:30:04:12 – 00:30:05:14
Grace
It is. It is.

00:30:05:22 – 00:30:07:09
Philippa White
Tell me what gives you hope?

00:30:07:09 – 00:30:47:01
Grace
Grace So the fact that we have this project alone gives me hope because already I feel like, you know, as much as we we think we have little or at least we reach out to this particular number of young people. But the thing that makes me want to all the time is that the very small number of girls that we have with with they are able to go out and stand up and say no to this, but also not only them, they are also they are also able to go and see the educate even their families to say no to that, no to this.

00:30:47:01 – 00:31:14:15
Grace
And this is the right way. That is the right that is the. But we all I would take that so that alone gives me hope to say, okay, if we are able to reach out to five more, I’m sure the five will reach out to Dinmore. Yeah. So that’s at least one of the things that gives me hope, but also the fact that our stakeholders alone have that trust in us and they keep on fighting and girls to us.

00:31:15:03 – 00:31:45:12
Grace
That’s also a motivation, at least at this, something that would always, always sit, okay, so it is they trust us, okay? This is what you know. So it’s always good to have those kind of support minus people like you who always want to have us still seeing us telling the stories that we or at least telling, showing whatever we’re doing with other people and to get to inspire any other people.

00:31:45:16 – 00:31:51:04
Grace
I mean, the more people outside the world, that’s also a motivation to us. That’s, we’ll say a hope.

00:31:51:16 – 00:32:34:12
Philippa White
Yeah, well, I’m happy that we can help a bit. It’s been a really wonderful conversation. I really appreciate your time. What Chance for change is doing is really important. I have to say we work on so many different projects around the world, but I remember very, very clearly reading Kate’s project. I think it was Kate’s project, and I remember reading the brief and this is a while ago, but I just remember sitting at my desk and going through the brief and I got really emotional and I started to cry and I just thought, God, you know, because when I picture, it’s just the challenges that some young people face and some parts of the world.

00:32:34:12 – 00:33:02:07
Philippa White
I mean, it’s a lottery where you are born and where you end up. No one is better than anyone else. Just some people have different opportunities and other people. And when you think of what some of these young people face in places like Malawi because of the circumstances, and then, you know, you just look at the work that you guys are doing and you just give your your lives to trying to support these people.

00:33:02:07 – 00:33:28:08
Philippa White
It’s just humbling and so important. So I really appreciate your important work and feel very pleased that we can be a small part of it and help it in some way. But I do believe that this time accelerator project bringing together leaders from around the world to just help you think and strategize and put this business plan into place to further help these young people.

00:33:28:08 – 00:33:49:02
Philippa White
It’s just really important. So thank you for doing what you do and for taking the time to chat with me today. And I hope those who are listening, if this inspires you and gets you excited, I hope it does. The work is really, really important. The chance to change your doing. And yeah, please, please get in touch so that you can also get involved.

00:33:49:11 – 00:34:04:24
Grace
Thank you. Thank you very much. Phillipa and your team also. Thank you for listening to all these stories that we have and helping us to become the best. We don’t take this for granted. So appreciate it. Thank you very much.

00:34:04:24 – 00:34:07:23
Philippa White
Great. Thank you, Grace. Enjoy the rest of your evening.

00:34:08:04 – 00:34:13:01
Grace
Thank you. Thank you.

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