Tess Willcox on her TIE Accelerator experience

Tess is a CEO of an Australian resort marketing agency focusing on the sustainable travel sector.

But, 15 months of having borders slam shut and there being no international travel – she and her team had to reinvent. And find new ways to respond to the new normal.

So what did she do when her business started to take the biggest hit?

She applied for TIE Accelerator.

And here Tess tells you why.

Tess will bring to life where she was personally and professionally.

She’ll tell you about the experience of working with a Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest NGO.

We’ll hear about what her initial feelings were coming into the experience, the doubts and then what happened.

And then Tess tells us what her biggest lesson was after 6 weeks. And it really isn’t what you would expect.

So, throw on those running shoes, or grab that favorite beverage, and have a listen!

Please do let us know what you think of this episode. And don’t forget to leave a review, rating, and subscribe.

If you would like to get in touch with Tess you can find her on Instagram at @tesswillcox

If you would like to get involved with TIE, and be a part of the important change that needs to be made in the world, do get in touch here.

00:00:07:20 – 00:00:29:13
Philippa White
So the questions are these How can we really activate the best of the private sector to meet the challenges of the real world? Is there a way to accelerate my career that doesn’t involve boring online or classroom courses? And can I really impact people in the developing world with the skills that I have? Can I finally feel proud of what I know?

00:00:30:05 – 00:01:01:12
Philippa White
Those are the questions and this podcast will give you the answers. My name is Philippa White and this is TIE Unearthed. Keep listening and you can follow us on our journey as we show you how we’re connecting the private sector with the social sector. To make change. Hello everyone. Philippa Whyte here and welcome to episode 24 of TIE Unearthed.

00:01:01:24 – 00:01:32:15
Philippa White
Now today I’m speaking with Tess Willcox, who’s the CEO of World Resorts of Distinction, which is a resort marketing agency that had been running for 15 years and founder of soon to launch Slogan Studios, which seeks to be the leading platform for diverse and marginalized women from across the globe. And Tess is also a Thai alumnus who just finished her TAI program with us, which is also a big reason why she’s speaking with us today.

00:01:32:15 – 00:01:35:18
Philippa White
So thank you for joining us, Tess. It’s great to have you.

00:01:35:22 – 00:01:40:21
Tess Willcox
Oh, thank you so much for having me on. I’m so excited to have this chat with you today.

00:01:41:05 – 00:01:47:17
Philippa White
Now, perhaps you can tell our listeners a little bit more about you and your background, what you do.

00:01:47:18 – 00:02:15:10
Tess Willcox
Sure. So to kind of bring up what you were saying before, so I’ve had I’ve worked for a marketing agency called World Resorts of Distinction for the past. It’s actually been, I think, 16 or 17 years. I might have rounded that down a little, but I, I, it’s a resort marketing agency that had kind of been skewed to focus more on this sustainable sector of the industry in its latter years.

00:02:16:05 – 00:02:52:10
Tess Willcox
I had worked for the company for about 14 years before I brought into it, bought into the company and then bought my business partner. So I solely owned it for the last four years or so and had been working with some of the best resorts in the world. The, you know, the real leaders in the sustainability sector. And then, as we all know, COVID hit last year and for a lot of the places that are based in Australia, our borders actually slammed shut in March last year and have been shut ever since.

00:02:52:10 – 00:03:22:13
Tess Willcox
So we’re going on almost 15 months now of not being allowed any international travel which which really made, I suppose, keeping the business alive quite a challenge. We had one out of 20 clients stay on board, so it was a very big kind of shift for my team and I had to let a lot of my team go because they’re just really still at this point is no kind of foreseeable future for our borders to open.

00:03:22:13 – 00:03:55:02
Tess Willcox
So in the interim, I suppose, and the silver lining of it all happening was we had really wanted to bring something of more impact besides the sustainable travel sector into the market. And that’s essentially what we’ve been working on the past few months is the concept of of slow gen studio. So kind of bringing my 15 plus years of experience in, in the sustainable travel sector and fuzing it with the social impact sector.

00:03:55:20 – 00:04:15:11
Tess Willcox
And you know, moving towards creating a platform in that arena is, is basically where I kind of currently exist in, in the room and you know, lots of exciting things to kind of move forward. And I can definitely get into this idea and studio side of things a bit more during our chats.

00:04:16:14 – 00:04:33:07
Philippa White
Yeah, well I’m fascinated and I didn’t leave, I didn’t know this detail of I can imagine the pivot. I can imagine you obviously having to respond to the the current situation actually in the same way that Ty had to.

00:04:33:15 – 00:04:34:21
Tess Willcox
Yeah, absolutely.

00:04:34:21 – 00:05:12:21
Philippa White
Like we’re kindred spirits. Having had to respond in a very quick way. But also, like you say, silver linings. Right. And how wonderful to be able to see it as an opportunity and to be able to thrive with that and to be able to see the. Yeah. New opportunities. So maybe just for our listeners, do you want to just bring to the light a little bit more slow journey just before we sort of get into the other questions I have for you, but I’m keen to understand kind of where you’re headed, how, how you went from a travel, and then you went to the slow journey.

00:05:12:21 – 00:05:16:23
Philippa White
What was that? What was that pivot and where are you now?

00:05:17:02 – 00:06:00:00
Tess Willcox
So I suppose because we’ve I mean, the acronym for my previous companies days, so if I refer to it as that throughout this conversation, that is well, it’s a distinction just for everyone listening at home. So with Day, I suppose we had been really well versed in the sustainable slash regenerative travel industry and over the past few years my former partner was a well, he still is a photojournalist based in in Kenya and had been covering mainly conflict and you know, refugee crisis and and climate the climate crisis.

00:06:00:00 – 00:06:30:08
Tess Willcox
And it had been something that I was always very interested in personally. And I had tried to kind of infiltrate into, well, results of distinction as a business, but it wasn’t it wasn’t the easiest, I guess, fusion with, you know, these luxury resorts and just these there’s such pinnacle world issues. I never really found a way to kind of have the conversation and and really bring it in under one umbrella and a business.

00:06:30:08 – 00:07:02:23
Tess Willcox
And so what the last 12 months has, I suppose, provided the the still existing team and I, I guess super roo you know welcome mood boarding 12 months of how we can bring all of these issues to one platform and what we I suppose what we identified was that there’s currently no female founded, owned and contributed cross-media platforms that are addressing the issues of regenerative travel, environmentalism and humanism.

00:07:02:23 – 00:07:30:14
Tess Willcox
And I suppose under that umbrella, what it what it is, is, you know, there’s no place that is purely driven by diverse and marginalized women from around the world that are, you know, having these conversations around what’s happening on the ground in terms of climate change, what’s happening on the ground in terms of, you know, travel, regenerative travel in a way that’s actually bringing back to these destinations that are so rife with overtourism.

00:07:31:02 – 00:08:00:13
Tess Willcox
And also, you know, the humanism sector and what’s happening on the ground in that aspect. And and what we kind of identified as a group of women, there was no place where we could go to read or to learn about what we really wanted to know with a female voice in a female slant. And, and I suppose a new style of journalism that we’re kind of coining slow journalism, which is where Slow Jane kind of comes into it.

00:08:00:13 – 00:08:23:00
Tess Willcox
And, you know, the the the reason we titled it so, Jane, was because it was a fusion of slow journeys, slow sojourns and slow journalism, which, you know, is kind of everything that we wanted to embody. So it’s a little bit of a mouthful when you first hear it, but it really encapsulates everything that we kind of wanted to address within the business.

00:08:23:10 – 00:08:52:16
Tess Willcox
So I suppose the real overarching thing that we were wanting to achieve with with the company is that, you know, we believe that everyone should have a platform and deserves to have a platform to tell their story, especially in the social impact sectors that we’re interested in. And we really wanted to, you know, plug the gap by helping unheard voices rise to the fore and become a platform for the platform.

00:08:52:19 – 00:09:16:20
Tess Willcox
US and, you know, being really female focused is, is just something that we’re really passionate about because there has been obviously such a dominant male voice in these sectors for such a long time. So we just thought it was a really for females just have such a different perspective on on so many things especially on the ground in the countries that are the most affected by, you know, the things that we’re looking at.

00:09:16:20 – 00:09:33:02
Tess Willcox
So we really wanted to have that female focused voice. And it doesn’t mean that there won’t be men featured on the platform. It just means that, you know, all the contributors are going to be females. So that that’s a bit of an overview of what we’re hoping to launch.

00:09:33:09 – 00:09:36:21
Philippa White
Yeah, amazing. That’s super exciting. Congratulations.

00:09:36:21 – 00:10:02:20
Tess Willcox
Thank you. Yeah, we’re really excited. It’s been a big passion project is probably the wrong word, but just something that we’re all really, you know, quite just big advocates for. So it’s been a big, you know, a really important and really kind of soul fulfilling project to date and hopefully we can carry that through on the actual platform.

00:10:03:01 – 00:10:34:17
Philippa White
Yeah. What I find impressive and this is obviously why I, I, I really wanted to talk to you today is even in the midst of all of this. So, you know, your, your business obviously being significantly challenged as a result of COVID. You’re looking for, you know, setting up your new initiative and you apply for tie accelerator. So, you know, it’s it says a lot about you and also your mission, everything.

00:10:34:17 – 00:10:39:00
Philippa White
So tell me, why did you apply and what did you hope to accomplish?

00:10:39:01 – 00:11:05:10
Tess Willcox
It’s actually it’s quite a serendipitous story. And, I mean, I had over obviously over the last nine months, which was where my business took, I suppose, the biggest hit I hadn’t really been trying to amalgamate all these ideas I was having and all these things that I personally cared about and my team cared about. And I had just been trying to find an outlet of how do I help?

00:11:05:10 – 00:11:39:12
Tess Willcox
How do I get more involved? Like I can’t just idly sit by and watch, you know, I suppose NGOs need help and and different sectors that I’m so interested in need help while I am sitting in Australia, in, you know, in lockdown, but in such a privileged position. And so I, I kind of stumbled across tie I think it was on LinkedIn initially and then I went on what could only be described as a total go crash investigation.

00:11:40:23 – 00:11:41:04
Philippa White
Of.

00:11:41:04 – 00:12:05:16
Tess Willcox
What, of what you could do and how how it is applied. And you know, what would ordinarily in a COVID free world, how that would all kind of unravel if I was to go on, you know, do a similar program. And and to be honest, there was just as soon as I discovered time and and what was available, there was there was just no there was no turning back for me.

00:12:05:16 – 00:12:39:23
Tess Willcox
It just seemed like the perfect conduit for me to kind of get involved in in something that was bigger than what was happening in my life and and effect change somewhere else in the world, which I’m sure is the same as everyone else. That kind of comes, you know, to the to the tie platform. But I just think it was, you know, the serendipity of it is that when you’re going through these big milestones in your life and and you kind of feel like your world that you’ve built is caving in on you a little bit.

00:12:39:23 – 00:13:02:17
Tess Willcox
There’s always, you know, people that are going through so much more incredibly difficult things. And I think that’s that’s kind of what Ty was able to show me when I was researching it all was that I could dedicate my time to being able to help, you know, people that were doing just such incredible things for the world. So that’s that’s why I decided to do it.

00:13:02:17 – 00:13:27:15
Tess Willcox
And it was also such, you know, the serendipity of it is that it was so in line with with where I wanted to site the business and I just wanted to be so invested in learning the different aspects. And it really was the perfect thing for me to do because because there’s just so many different aspects of what I needed to learn in, you know, in reflection of the process.

00:13:28:10 – 00:13:31:08
Tess Willcox
So yeah, that’s, that’s kind of why I decided to do it.

00:13:31:18 – 00:13:44:16
Philippa White
Amazing. Well, first of all, thank you. That’s really so and so. First of all, it’s really great to know that, you know, the random posts that I post on LinkedIn can actually.

00:13:44:19 – 00:13:45:11
Tess Willcox
Force you out.

00:13:45:13 – 00:14:12:05
Philippa White
Discoverable owns it’s so it’s so lovely because yeah, as I say, I kind of feel a kindred, you know, we’re obviously going we’ve we are going through and have gone through a similar journey, I think. So it’s is great that I was able to speak to you through social media. Yeah, social media work sometimes. That’s great. So why don’t you tell our listeners, what organization did you work with?

00:14:12:12 – 00:14:16:23
Philippa White
Why did the project resonate with you? Can you bring that to life a little bit as well?

00:14:16:23 – 00:14:49:11
Tess Willcox
I can. So I had the privilege and the pleasure of working with Eric Hamby, which is an NGO based in Brazil, led by the most divine people that I had, you know, was just so blown away with whilst I was working with him. So essentially Eric can be is dedicated to saving the Atlantic rainforest in Brazil and among a plethora of amazing other things that they do in, you know, in that region.

00:14:49:11 – 00:15:20:08
Tess Willcox
And and I suppose, you know, the most amazing thing about about kind of deciding that they were the the company that I wanted to commit to was I have been a big climate change advocate and a big environmentalist my whole life. It’s just it’s only kind of been really you know, I’ve only been really brushing the surface, I suppose, in my professional life of it for a long time.

00:15:20:08 – 00:15:50:15
Tess Willcox
So when I was speaking to you and you gave me the few different options of what you know was possible, working with an NGO that was, you know, unreservedly committed to bettering the planet and, you know, sequestering carbon in the amounts that they do. But and not only that, but such a holistic commitment to the planet and to to the environment and to the local community and just, you know, the total encapsulation of everything I do.

00:15:50:15 – 00:16:17:22
Tess Willcox
I was, you know, what we say in Australia, I was an absolute gone. There is just no other, no other NGO that I would have chosen because they just were after I’d done a bit of research on Eric Tambien and Robyn and Bianca, who are the founders, I just was so enamored with their story and and just with their commitment and how, you know, how their journey had kind of gone from inception to where they currently are.

00:16:17:22 – 00:16:42:03
Tess Willcox
And I also I actually also identified a few different areas when I was researching them that I thought I could personally really help with. And I thought that that was quite an important part of the process as well. You know, for me to kind of, you know, research the company and and look at how I could personally contribute, knowing that there would be a lot that I would learn on the journey.

00:16:42:03 – 00:16:56:22
Tess Willcox
And and I mean, I could have never, ever, ever predicted the experience I would have on the journey. But there was a lot that I identified that I thought would be, you know, that I could positively impact. So, yeah, that’s why the yeah.

00:16:56:23 – 00:17:11:04
Philippa White
Talk about the experience. I mean what you guys pulled off the group just the set up the sort of because it’s quite intense isn’t it. It’s six weeks. Can you, can you bring to life just. Yeah. That journey I guess.

00:17:11:07 – 00:17:12:06
Tess Willcox
Yeah, absolutely.

00:17:12:06 – 00:17:14:04
Philippa White
And at the beginning, in the end, I mean like.

00:17:14:04 – 00:17:39:20
Tess Willcox
I was saying to you before, I’m so unsure whether we were just blessed with the most incredible group of people or whether this is quite a, you know, a normal thing for the different accelerator programs. But we had it within the six of our team. It was five women from all over the world and and one man and just the dynamic of the group was was so unbelievable.

00:17:39:20 – 00:18:05:00
Tess Willcox
And we all had very different personalities. We all came from different leadership roles. We all came from totally opposing industries. And and I mean, the first call is always a little bit like, oh, my gosh, am I going to like these people? Are we going to butt heads? You know, when when you get so many people in a group that are all from a role of leadership, it’s always a bit nerve wracking.

00:18:05:01 – 00:18:38:04
Tess Willcox
Like, you just don’t know what the dynamics are going to be. But we were so lucky and I mean, everybody in our group of six was just so lovely and so intelligent and so committed to, as opposed to removing their ego from the whole process so that we could all be vulnerable and show our strengths and our weaknesses and work together as a team to really, you know, just have as much of an impact as we could possibly have for Eric can be and what we ended up producing.

00:18:38:04 – 00:19:00:06
Tess Willcox
I’m like, you know, Bianca had said at the end in our in our assessment, I suppose there was a point where she thought she she was unsure if we were going to pull off what we had hoped to achieve. And we all felt like that at some point. But we we managed to develop what we’ve titled a prospectus for your can be.

00:19:00:06 – 00:19:35:12
Tess Willcox
And essentially what it is, is, I like a corporate strategic corporate marketing proposal. So what what they actually needed was just some collateral to be able to send out to different businesses and different companies that had been inquiring about what they were doing, which for for want of a better explanation, is essentially a holistic tree planting journey from seedlings through to the maintenance of the entire forest and the preservation of the Atlantic rainforest.

00:19:35:21 – 00:19:56:19
Tess Willcox
And what they really needed was, you know, a prospectus that they could have that they could send out because everything was being done, it being being done completely manually. So if they were getting an inquiry from a corporate potential donor or sponsor, the team would be having to kind of whip up some collateral to be able to send to them.

00:19:56:19 – 00:20:00:00
Tess Willcox
And it just wasn’t a feasible thing for them every time.

00:20:00:02 – 00:20:00:15
Philippa White
Yeah.

00:20:01:00 – 00:20:31:24
Tess Willcox
Every single time. Which you shouldn’t wasting so much work. So we kind of identified that the prospectus would be the best way to go for them, which was so interesting to me because I went in, as I’ve discussed with you, with a totally different mindset, like I went in, which was my biggest lesson throughout the journey, was you know, as we kind of learn through the process is to is to listen and to understand what the needs of the people on the ground are, as opposed to telling them what their needs are.

00:20:31:24 – 00:20:57:16
Tess Willcox
And that was my biggest lesson was I went in thinking, okay, great. In my first meeting in my head, typical, you know, Western world leader of a marketing team, I had to solve the issue within the first minute, which is so ridiculous. And it was wrong. Like I just thought that I was I had so many corporate donors I could organize for them.

00:20:57:16 – 00:21:23:20
Tess Willcox
I had sponsorship packages, I had all these things, but I just had gone way too far down the track. And when I discussed it with when the team and I had our discussion, we worked out that we didn’t even we couldn’t even get that far down the track because what they actually lacked was any collateral or any kind of system for them to be approaching corporate sponsors, which was which was where the real link in the chain was.

00:21:23:20 – 00:21:48:04
Tess Willcox
So it was such an interesting journey and just so totally eye opening for me because just through kind of a real wake up call as to how I approach problem solving in my businesses and with my team and just such, you know, not not to flog the metaphor of the ego, but just such an ego, like bringing the ego back down to earth.

00:21:48:04 – 00:21:58:14
Tess Willcox
Is that what my solution in my head is? Isn’t always the correct solution for, you know, the company that you’re working with. So that was very transformative for me.

00:21:59:14 – 00:22:22:14
Philippa White
Yeah, that’s interesting. And I think just for our listeners, because I’m aware this possible, some people are listening and aren’t even, you know, aware, you know what what what is this program? What is this? And I think just the reason why I set this up, you know, obviously we’ve been through a lot of changes, but the crux of what we’ve been doing for the past 16 years, I guess, is that we believe that everyone can be a change maker.

00:22:23:19 – 00:23:03:24
Philippa White
Everyone can make change in some way. And the way that we do that is by connecting the private sector with the social sector to create a catalyst for change. But that catalyst for change isn’t, of course, just the actual difference that you’re making for that organization that you’re working with. It’s also unlocking different leadership styles. It’s unlocking different ways to approach challenges and unlocking, of course, the understanding about, you know, the social world and international development and the different just different dynamics that exist in that world to then bring that learning back to your work, your role, your company.

00:23:03:24 – 00:23:25:02
Philippa White
Because we do believe that the private sector can be a huge driver of change and the knowledge and the skills that we have. And we just need to apply them perhaps in slightly different ways with our clients or with our our everyday work. And so that’s, you know, that’s the that’s obviously what Thai is. And we do this, of course, through Thai accelerator.

00:23:25:02 – 00:23:46:14
Philippa White
And it’s just so exciting listening to you, reflecting on the leadership, because I think a big part of it, of course, is isn’t it wonderful that you can make a difference to an organization like there can be, but just the dynamic of having four or six people because we have different sort of sized groups, three, four or five or six people, depending on what the fit is.

00:23:46:14 – 00:24:20:19
Philippa White
But, you know, six people coming together from all over the world to really unlock insights, find solutions to challenges for an organization in a short amount of time. It it is challenging and it, it, it and it will get you seeing things in different ways. And it’s super exciting to hear that it did that. And I just wonder, you know, for you, what was an aha moment that perhaps changed the way that you think in some way or, you know, how how do you see this perhaps impacting your work moving forward or how you approach things?

00:24:20:21 – 00:24:50:13
Tess Willcox
I mean, I think and I went into the accelerator program with this as a go and and I absolutely think that it made me it made me stop and it made me a lot more reflective on the entire like the entirety of the situation before I responded, because I’m so used to leading big teams and having to kind of move through things really quickly and have answers for people very quickly.

00:24:50:13 – 00:25:22:14
Tess Willcox
And and, you know, I give my team guidance on things and, you know, and almost always giving, I suppose, the time that is required for the project. But but the most apparent thing for me with this experience was it allowed me to be a bit not slower in pace, but it allowed me to kind of look at the overview of what we were hoping to achieve and take a step back before trying to lead, which was something that doesn’t come naturally to me at all.

00:25:22:14 – 00:25:45:10
Tess Willcox
I’m just so I just am just so it’s just my default mechanism to lead. And, you know, it’s such a it’s such a default mode for me to kind of take the lead because I hate awkward silence is so whenever and you would have noticed that Phillip whenever there was an awkward silence on a zoom call I just I’m not very good at handling that, so I automatically jump in and start chatting.

00:25:45:21 – 00:26:22:06
Tess Willcox
So there was a lot of times, you know, just with small things like that, but then also with the really big things, with the big issues we were trying to solve and especially in the social impact sector, these aren’t thing, they’re not small issues and they’re not things that can be decided immediately. So I suppose, you know, the the time allowance to be slow and to really reflect on things before I responded and to sit back and allow other people to lead was absolutely my biggest, you know, my biggest revelation through the whole the whole course.

00:26:22:06 – 00:26:48:08
Tess Willcox
And I think I will really respectfully carry that through, you know, the way that I work with my teams and and my clients in the future, because it really did change the way that, you know, we had an outcome and it made it feel like the outcome of what we were doing was more collaborative as opposed to, you know, employing an agency that just fixes the problem.

00:26:48:08 – 00:27:19:03
Tess Willcox
And it really made. Yeah, just it was it was so much it was so much of a nice result because we had been collaborative with the founders Binker and Robyn and the team the whole time. So it was just such a nice end result because everyone had worked together throughout the process as opposed to, you know, what normally happens in a creative agency is a brief, a problem, a solution, and then a result which, you know, this was just such a different experience.

00:27:19:03 – 00:27:26:06
Tess Willcox
And I, I think that’s what I’ll carry through, through with my team and with my clients. Absolutely.

00:27:26:07 – 00:27:46:05
Philippa White
I also have I’m so happy to hear that. And actually, just so you know, and also so the listeners know, I got a a a WhatsApp message from Binker as just a couple of weeks ago, actually, just sort of tying the last couple of things up and just updating me on things. And she said, I just want you to know this changed our lives.

00:27:46:05 – 00:28:01:17
Philippa White
Oh, my gosh. Like that changed our lives. I mean, that’s not a small thing for someone who grew up like like they moved to the middle of literally nowhere. And this organization, however, 30 years ago.

00:28:01:19 – 00:28:29:20
Tess Willcox
And the amount of times that I’ve cried during this process, just because they’re they’re just the loveliest people and what they’re doing is just so transformative for the world. And, I mean, you and I cried on the same zoom call, but they’re just everything everything about them is just so divine. So that makes me so happy. Like, even if that was the only outcome of everything that is, it makes it all worth it.

00:28:30:06 – 00:28:54:00
Philippa White
Yeah. And I mean, it really is going to be incredibly transformational what came out of this. And I think that’s the other thing that I find. So this is what keeps me going is it’s amazing how with limited resources what is possible. I mean, we’re talking limited financial resources, limited time resources, limited human resources. Like there was a group of six of you with six weeks.

00:28:54:19 – 00:29:11:21
Philippa White
Two of those weeks was kind of preparation and getting ready to kind of hit the ground running. And at the end of it, you guys have pulled together something that I mean, obviously we are going to be following this incredibly closely, but I would like to think that we will have a follow up podcast possible. I don’t know what is going to be going on.

00:29:12:05 – 00:29:33:22
Philippa White
I have no idea. But talking about the impact of this placement, because basically they needed to get corporate sponsors to understand the importance of their work and to get on board point blank, that was it. Yeah. And I and you know, you guys have created something that I truly believe will capture the hearts and minds of corporates because of the way that you’ve positioned it.

00:29:34:07 – 00:29:46:01
Philippa White
It’s it’s incredibly powerful. It’s an opportunity for these corporates to support an organization that is not only important for the world, but also for those corporates focusing on there is.

00:29:46:01 – 00:29:46:23
Tess Willcox
Absolutely.

00:29:46:23 – 00:30:09:16
Philippa White
So it’s it was a beautiful piece of work that you pulled together. And I mean, I’m super proud and super excited and just getting that message from Brinker saying that you changed our lives. Now our next time accelerator project, we’re launching it actually soon. I think this week is our plan to kind of get some stuff out again to reach people.

00:30:10:13 – 00:30:43:02
Philippa White
And I just wanted you to know about it because I think it might resonate, but basically it’s I don’t know if you know, but 2.8 billion people in the world still don’t have access to clean cooking. So clean cooking would mean, you know, solar, electricity, gas, fuel efficient stoves. So 2.8 billion people still use open pit fires to cook, which which means obviously there’s a lot of smoke in houses if they’re cooking in houses or if the cooking outside.

00:30:43:02 – 00:31:06:07
Philippa White
Still, there’s just a lot of smoke. So the second leading cause of death for adults in these regions is lower respiratory infections because of lower respiratory infections. And the leading cause of death for children under five is lower respiratory infections. And then, of course, it’s, you know, the amount of wood that has to be cut down. And then, of course, it’s the economy.

00:31:06:07 – 00:31:29:18
Philippa White
I mean, think about it. If people are having to travel further and further and further to cut down trees so that they can simply eat people spend, can’t remember what the percentage is. It’s quite a high percentage of their income just on fuel to be able to eat. So there’s there’s an energy meeting at the UN. It’s the high level dialog on energy.

00:31:29:18 – 00:31:48:18
Philippa White
It’s happening in September and Malawi, which still has a huge proportion of their population, even though they have a lot of fuel efficient stoves. And actually that was a project that we worked on many years ago with them. We helped them reach 2 million of these stove. Wow, you know, in circulation. So yeah, time was a big part of that, which is really cool.

00:31:48:24 – 00:32:16:02
Philippa White
But there’s still a huge number of people that don’t have a voice. And as you can imagine, at a big UN high level dialog on energy, the voice comes from the solar, electricity, gas industries, but the biomass industry doesn’t have a voice. And so Malawi is actually going to be representing these 2.8 billion people at this meeting, but they don’t have any money or voice or anything behind them to help give them that voice.

00:32:16:02 – 00:32:36:21
Philippa White
And so this is going to be our next project that we’re needing six people to come together to help Malawi have a voice at this meeting. And I just wonder, because of your, you know, your background, because of your interest of even getting involved in Ty Accelerator and working with there can be in your experience that there can be.

00:32:37:03 – 00:32:51:10
Philippa White
I just wonder if, you know, if someone from your network is listening or someone from, you know, ties network is listening to you speak on this podcast. And they’re sort of in that moment of, oh, I don’t know, should I do it? I don’t know if I should. I’d like to do it. I don’t know if I can.

00:32:51:17 – 00:32:56:05
Philippa White
What would you what could you say or what would you say to someone who’s maybe thinking to apply?

00:32:56:23 – 00:33:42:24
Tess Willcox
I mean, apart from just jumping back onto the TY website to reapply for this specific accelerator program? For myself, I just I mean, there there is there’s no greater way, in my opinion, to affect change so immediately than than opting into the TY Accelerator program. But specifically for this one, we are just such a person and tipping point in the planet and and, you know, issues like this are, you know, as are so important at this stage and you know the most underrepresented companies sorry countries in the world having a voice is is one of the most pertinent issues of our time.

00:33:42:24 – 00:34:14:22
Tess Willcox
And so to be involved in that and to be that’s that is being involved in something that’s on the world stage that will have that will be you know, that’s effectively changing world history. If, you know, if this program if these kind of placements do a good enough job, which I am absolutely confident they will, I just think there is no more tangible and immediately effective exercise to do for people to get involved in something like that.

00:34:14:22 – 00:34:36:20
Tess Willcox
I could honestly, personally and professionally couldn’t recommend anyone getting involved more highly, but especially in that program and especially for a country like Malawi, I just think, you know, they’re you know, everyone’s in a very kind of holding pattern in their life right now. And I mean, that’s one of the other reasons why I decided to do Ty Accelerator.

00:34:36:20 – 00:34:46:14
Tess Willcox
And I think it was it would just be it just it couldn’t be more highly recommended by me. So everybody should jump on the website and book your position.

00:34:47:13 – 00:35:03:07
Philippa White
So wonderful. Just seeing the dynamics of the groups and seeing the learnings in those Aha moments and, and then of course the impact on the organizations. I mean it really is and I know that, I mean, of course I’m going to say this, I guess, because I’m the founder of the organization, but I say it because I genuinely mean it.

00:35:03:07 – 00:35:20:14
Philippa White
It’s like it is a win win. It’s like you have these individuals that they genuinely get stuff out of it. But then the organizations are like, Yeah, you know, you’re changing our lives. Yeah, it’s amazing. It’s so impactful. You’re leaving a legacy. So yeah, listen to us. I can’t tell you how much of a pleasure it has been like working with you and getting to know you.

00:35:20:14 – 00:35:31:08
Philippa White
And I hope like I always say this on, you know, the whole program, but I genuinely mean it as well. I mean, once you’re part of time. Yes, I know you’re in you get your your your funny time for life.

00:35:31:08 – 00:35:32:14
Tess Willcox
You can’t get rid of me now.

00:35:33:04 – 00:35:39:23
Philippa White
No. Yeah. Listen, thank you so much for your time. Have a lovely rest of your day.

00:35:39:24 – 00:35:40:18
Tess Willcox
Thank you.

00:35:40:18 – 00:35:43:14
Philippa White
Way. Yes. Evening. And we will speak soon.

00:35:43:14 – 00:35:46:14
Tess Willcox
Yeah, it sounds amazing. Thank you so much. Take care.

00:35:46:21 – 00:35:50:03
Philippa White
Bye bye.

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