India, child rights, and the answer to solving any problem in the world

Keen to know the answer to solving any problem in the world?

You'll find the answer in this episode.

Today I speak with Parul, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Shaishav, an NGO in India that fights for the rights of children. They just celebrated their 26th anniversary.

We learn about all of the incredible work they do.

The impact of TIE, BBH, and Emma Johnston-Donne in 2017. And everything that came out of that experience.

We learn about the real challenges that India faces that you may not have known. What the real priorities of the country are. And aren’t.

And then we hear of the impact of Covid. You won’t believe what is happening. It’s shocking.

This episode is sobering. But we also hear of Parul’s hope.

If you would like to learn more about Shaishav and contribute to their important work, you can find out more here.

00:00:07:20 – 00:00:29:14
Philippa White
So the questions are these How can we really activate the best of the private sector to meet the challenges of the real world? Is there a way to accelerate my career that doesn’t involve boring online or classroom courses? And can I really impact people in the developing world with the skills that I have? Can I finally feel proud of what I know?

00:00:30:06 – 00:01:01:04
Philippa White
Those are the questions and this podcast will give you the answers. My name is Philippa White and this is TIE Unearthed. Keep listening and you can follow us on our journey as we show you how we’re connecting the private sector with the social sector to make change. Hello everyone Filipowicz here and welcome to Episode 12 of TIE’s podcast.

00:01:01:05 – 00:01:18:03
Philippa White
Today I’m speaking with Parul Sheth, Co-Founder and executive director of Shy Shop, a voluntary organization based in Gujarat, India. And Gujarat is the land of Gandhi. Hello, Parul. It’s lovely to have you with us today.

00:01:18:15 – 00:01:24:18
Parul Sheth
Hello, Phillip. It’s so nice to connect with you. Thank you so much for having me here.

00:01:24:18 – 00:01:51:17
Philippa White
It’s so good. Great. Let me just bring to life you and Shihab for our listeners. So shy chef works with underprivileged children such as child labor, non-school going children, slum children, tribal children and girls. Now, Shihab believes that children are change makers, and Perumal drives the mission development public relations and supervises the ongoing work that the organization does.

00:01:52:05 – 00:02:18:24
Philippa White
She has worked as a trainer and facilitator at national and international levels on child rights issues, has fought to reduce child labor, child marriage, child abuse, child sexual abuse and exploitation through the education, protection and empowerment of children. Now she holds a bachelor’s degree in commerce and law and a master’s in social work from the University of Bombay.

00:02:19:08 – 00:02:32:11
Philippa White
And Perumal is a Fulbright Humphrey fellow and an Ashoka fellow. So hello, Perumal. It’s just really great to have the opportunity to bring to life the super important work that you and Chef does.

00:02:33:04 – 00:02:35:07
Parul Sheth
Thank you for this opportunity, PHILIPPa.

00:02:36:15 – 00:02:51:19
Philippa White
So what I’d really like to do is I’d love if you please I mean, I obviously just gave a little bit of a background to what you do, but I you know, I can’t do it justice without you actually telling people about it. So please, can you tell people about the story of why the organization was set up and what you do?

00:02:52:20 – 00:03:43:23
Parul Sheth
Sure. So I’m a very passionate child rights activist and co-founder of this organization called Social. It means childhood. So my husband and myself are both Ashoka fellows, and we both started this together, our social movements, childhood. And we wanted to make sure that all children, especially the marginalized children, get all their rights and joys of childhood. And that is why we started social and change with working with the various groups of children that PHILIPPa mentioned, with different programs that are that we offer to children over the history of social, we have done so many programs.

00:03:45:00 – 00:04:02:16
Parul Sheth
Also, change in strategy and staff has changed a lot of things have changed. But one thing that has always remained the same, and that is that children have always remained at the center of anything and everything that we do.

00:04:03:04 – 00:04:06:03
Philippa White
And how long ago did you and your husband set up social.

00:04:06:06 – 00:04:23:16
Parul Sheth
Services to set it up? In 1992? And we are working at Bhavnagar since 1994. So we we finished 26 years of our work and celebrated our Silver Jubilee Day in January.

00:04:23:17 – 00:04:36:21
Philippa White
Congratulations. Yes, that’s fantastic. That’s really good. And what I mean, what sparked the start of up for you and your husband? What what was the instigator?

00:04:36:21 – 00:05:08:01
Parul Sheth
So we both. One thing is that we love children. We believe that if they want to bring any change in the world, we need to begin with children and any problem that lies today in the world. If you want to really solve any problem of big terrorism with global warming and vermin crises or war or anything, you need to begin the change that’s happening from childhood.

00:05:08:13 – 00:05:52:07
Parul Sheth
So the intervention starts then that when we work with children and that is something that has really motivated us and we’ve been given we begin we begin with working with child labor because India has the highest number of child labor and when we begin the work we did one survey of child labor and identified 12,813 child labor of working in 106 different occupation from the city of Bhavnagar alone and and the child that became our the finding of that survey became the premises to build build our strategies and programs.

00:05:52:22 – 00:06:22:08
Parul Sheth
So we started community education centers in the communities where we identify the highest number of child labor. Then then we motivate the children and their parents to go to school and more first time. And all 78 children to school. In 1996, we started multipurpose more vertical program because in our survey we found that out of this are almost 13,000 children, 68% children never, ever went to school.

00:06:22:17 – 00:06:54:07
Parul Sheth
And of the 32% went 79% dropped out before they completed seventh grade. So we started working the government schools and they working in the schools and community. As PHILIPPa mentioned earlier, we believe that children are not beneficiaries or service takers. They are the rights holders and the changemakers. So we formed the community in communities and schools, children’s communities, and started providing training.

00:06:54:15 – 00:07:25:23
Parul Sheth
And then the children learned about their rights. They decided to form their own children’s collective called Inner Ms. literally means children’s collective one children’s army and then they grew up, they also formed the youth collective. So that’s how we started. We are also running Childline, which is 24 by seven Children Helpline, working for working with children who are in need of care and protection.

00:07:25:23 – 00:07:36:19
Parul Sheth
We are also providing childbirth resource and training center and very recently we’ve launched a new program about which I’m going to talk it talk about a little later.

00:07:36:24 – 00:08:02:07
Philippa White
Great. Well, I mean, you your organization is so inspirational. And every time I speak to you, I feel I just get covered in goosebumps. I find your work just so incredible. Now, we worked together in 2017, and I just wanted maybe you could tell our listeners about your experience with TIE and perhaps a story that stands out with regards to the impact of our work with you.

00:08:02:19 – 00:08:30:04
Parul Sheth
Oh, I can never forget it. In fact, when I was thinking about it before our call, I was thinking so much about Emma. Well, it was a great gift to us. You know, from time and imagine with so much passion and commitment and so many ideas. And she was so hard working that, you know, she was there for about a month.

00:08:30:04 – 00:09:02:13
Parul Sheth
But when I think about the contribution that she made to us, social, it is incredible. Like, you know, she helped us prepare the communication policy to design the logo and everything, you know, letterhead, PowerPoint presentation. But moreover, she helped us make our film, which gives the message about the impact of our work. She helped us get a very renowned photographer to do the photos.

00:09:02:13 – 00:09:22:20
Parul Sheth
Yeah. And she helped us design our website and so many things like, you know, when I think about that, how much she could manage to do just in that one month. It is incredible. Incredible. I mean, it is unimaginable. And besides that, she she’s become such a good friend, you know that.

00:09:23:11 – 00:09:26:00
Philippa White
So you’re still in very much.

00:09:26:08 – 00:09:54:19
Parul Sheth
She lives. So whatever happens in her life, we know about it. When I went to UK and two years ago we met I met our first son also and so great to meet again and we are very much in touch and she still supports, you know, contributes regularly through our global giving also. And she’s an incredible friend. But I tell you one.

00:09:54:19 – 00:09:55:08
Philippa White
Thing that’s.

00:09:55:08 – 00:10:18:09
Parul Sheth
Great. You’re not in Social Summit is someone who came to social and say that, you know, there is some manufacturing defect in social that, you know, the door is open. Only one way you can only you can only get then you can’t get out to a better life and of how so and are a lot of thought.

00:10:18:09 – 00:10:19:17
Philippa White
And that’s a great thing to me.

00:10:20:03 – 00:10:27:24
Parul Sheth
So all that happens to all of our volunteers. So we really love all of our volunteers and the contribution that they.

00:10:28:23 – 00:10:57:24
Philippa White
Tell you also touch other people’s lives in a very profound way. So it doesn’t you know, it’s not just one sided. It certainly is a win win for. Yes. Now, parole. April, can you tell us about the challenges that you face in your part of the world? I mean, I touched on it, obviously, in the introduction. And then when you talked about many of the challenges that you you are facing in India due to just the poverty and the children and what, you know, what they face.

00:10:57:24 – 00:11:04:18
Philippa White
But I just wonder, can you can you tell our listeners something that they might not know about the challenges in your part of the world?

00:11:04:18 – 00:11:42:02
Parul Sheth
Yeah, you know, children are not priority. Do you see children? But we don’t listen to them. And children are, you know, they policy that they care, but we don’t see it happening. I tell you that in India there are about 38 to 40% children. But out of the total budget for children, it is about 4%. So you can see that, you know, for poor 3% population, our priority who are supposed to be the topmost priority, we get only four, 4% budget for them.

00:11:42:02 – 00:12:09:14
Parul Sheth
The whole education system is very, very highly unequal. There are so many layers the rich children go to very high, high end private schools and then the is the grade was down. Then the most poor and marginalized children go to the government schools. All the teachers in the government school almost everywhere, at least in Gujarat, are getting very highly qualified.

00:12:10:00 – 00:12:44:12
Parul Sheth
But the education level and the quality of education is pathetic, very, very poor. The protection issues like child marriage, child labor, child trafficking, child sexual abuse, corporal punishment, you name it, you know, like all forms of child abuse have very, very high and like inequalities, the biggest threat, environmental issues that people are divided develop is on basis of caste and religion and language and class and so many ways.

00:12:44:24 – 00:13:16:08
Parul Sheth
And that percolates even among children. So that is like, you know, the gender discrimination is extremely high. So there are so many issues and that, you know, the children are facing the the stress of education is so high now now due to or will they their in their education, everything has gone online because all the schools are closed from March until now.

00:13:16:20 – 00:13:20:19
Parul Sheth
And I don’t know how long it is going to remain closed. And then, you.

00:13:21:00 – 00:13:44:19
Philippa White
Know, that’s actually that’s something I actually wanted to ask you as I think of you and Shirish have got all this so often when I think of how various different communities and people and countries are affected by COVID and please actually can you can you bring to life how you and the work your work has been impacted by COVID because I’m sure it’s been really impacted by this part.

00:13:44:19 – 00:14:11:01
Parul Sheth
Yeah, because as I said, not all schools are closed. And so you are not able to get in touch with other children. And we are of course we are new started working in communities and the villages with the children in very small groups by maintaining all the protocols and all the care that we need to take. But everything is moved like shifted to online education.

00:14:11:09 – 00:14:36:05
Parul Sheth
But the children with whom we are working on not only our children all over the country, more than 75 to 80%, children don’t have access to Internet and mobile and smartphone, and so they can’t continue their education. It is very like, you know, in the family, typically there is one phone and usually it is with the father. Father goes to work, comes back in the evening.

00:14:36:14 – 00:15:04:20
Parul Sheth
So if there are any some messages, then there are three siblings or four siblings. They have to share the time on the mobile. So it is like, you know, the, the relation it is so difficult then now earlier health was one of the factors which was pushing the people down. It is still number one below the poverty line they were pushing and now it is also additionally education because people are selling their animals to buy smartphones for the kids.

00:15:05:06 – 00:15:32:15
Parul Sheth
So it is becoming really crazy. And still the the the Internet issues are so high that children don’t have Internet. They have walk and walk far to get Internet somewhere. And cases of child abuse like, you know, child labor, child trafficking, child marriage and sexual abuse, domestic violence, etc., are really increasing like an alarming rate during during the pandemic.

00:15:32:22 – 00:15:59:03
Parul Sheth
The economic pressure is so high that children are forced to start working with the parents. So there are so many issues that is coming up because of the COVID. We are trying to do our bit in whatever way we we did some rehabilitation sorry relief work by distributing ration which we prepare it in order to improve the resource group.

00:15:59:12 – 00:16:21:24
Parul Sheth
And we distributed to all the children with whom we work and we our team goes there and door to door and give them guidance and support. But it is with a very limited number of children, not like not many, many children. So so many children are out of this. This whole support system. So that is very bad, really.

00:16:22:14 – 00:16:47:14
Philippa White
Honestly, even just this topic. I have so many questions for you. We don’t have enough time. I feel like I need to call you again and have another conversation where we’re facing the similar things in Brazil. Schools apparently are going to be opening up in November. But, you know, there’s just so many challenges around all of this and what the long term impact is going to be on a generation of children.

00:16:47:22 – 00:17:12:06
Philippa White
The impact, as we know, it’s so important to educate girls before the age of 12. So many of these countries that are not able to do that. And then the chances of these young people going back to school after they’ve been working in the family and the families just don’t see the value anymore. I mean, there’s a lot of those types of conversations happening here and the impact that that’s going to happen or have sorry on.

00:17:13:07 – 00:17:14:22
Parul Sheth
This is not a lot of loss.

00:17:15:06 – 00:17:15:14
Philippa White
On the.

00:17:15:14 – 00:17:28:14
Parul Sheth
Culture of work is gone pushed back to 2030 years back all the movement movements movement, child movement, everyone you know labor movement everything has gone down. It’s really very.

00:17:28:14 – 00:17:43:19
Philippa White
Bad. 20 to 30 years. That’s really bad. Gosh. So, I mean, bringing to the next question that I have for you that maybe is related or maybe not, but what keeps you up at night? Worrying at the moment. But also, I’d love to know what gives you hope.

00:17:44:10 – 00:18:18:01
Parul Sheth
So in the present environment, socio economic, political, cultural in India and across the globe is really kind of, you know, very, very much worrying because, you know, we are trying to divide people on so many levels, not only gender, caste, class, so many ways. And the situation of like the environment issues are so much of like it’s alarmingly ivory.

00:18:18:12 – 00:18:49:12
Parul Sheth
And our children, we are telling them, look, you know, education is very powerful. You need to study and they are motivated to study and they somehow struggle to study. But our education system is so big that what they get at the end of it, they don’t get a job, they don’t get any skills to be independent. And ultimately they end up, you know, with very, very bad what you say challenging situation at the.

00:18:49:20 – 00:19:16:11
Parul Sheth
So we are giving them wings but when they start flying we don’t know what are they going to encounter with. So that is something very much worrying for me and I feel like, you know, our education system is something that is leading them to more frustration. So of course, our children, we give them life skills and values. That is why they somehow managed to sail through this situation.

00:19:16:21 – 00:19:59:10
Parul Sheth
And I what I am a very hopeful is that when the children pass through such empowerment process, what they can overcome all these challenges somehow. And that is my hope that no children in is anything any change that you want to do will have to begin with children, as I said earlier. And if that strategy like the way we are doing right now, that I can see so many lives of children are transformed and that gives me a lot of sense of fulfillment and contentment because it is very, very fulfilling.

00:19:59:16 – 00:20:22:17
Philippa White
I can imagine. Can you I mean, this isn’t something that I’ve asked you to prepare for, but I just wondered just quickly, is there a story of somebody, a child that you have worked with and you’ve you’ve seen the transformation of that child? Can you bring to life a story that talks about that transformation and where that child is now due to the work that you you’ve.

00:20:22:17 – 00:20:27:00
Parul Sheth
Done so many stories. Oh, my God, I can tell you what?

00:20:27:11 – 00:20:28:05
Philippa White
Is there one?

00:20:28:23 – 00:20:53:16
Parul Sheth
Okay. I tell you one that comes to my mind right now, are there was this one girl she joined hour from her school when she was in, I think seventh grade. And that time she she was part of our children’s collective, not not in leadership, but she was happy. And then we we didn’t realize. But she dropped out of the school.

00:20:54:01 – 00:21:19:08
Parul Sheth
But because she didn’t go to school, she had a lot more time free then because she doesn’t have to go to school, not tuition. So she became very active in Beltane and participated in all activities, in all programs. So she became very good leader in Virginia and then she moved up and then she was told contested the election for Senate president, which is the topmost position and balcony.

00:21:19:17 – 00:21:50:01
Parul Sheth
Balcony is our children’s collective and then people when she was giving that her electoral speech to children at the time that you know in our balcony we talk about that children have the right to education. You are not studying yourself and how will you motivate others and she that really stuck to so she said oh yes I promise that whether I’m elected or not, I will continue my education.

00:21:50:10 – 00:22:20:10
Parul Sheth
And then she really kept her promise. She got elected, of course, but she continued, and she you get our help. She appeared directly for the 10th grade exams and external student and passed it in the first that then and then that that. Then she wanted to continue our education and her family did not allow her. But, you know, her friends and our team somehow managed to convince her and they admitted her in a government school.

00:22:20:20 – 00:22:42:04
Parul Sheth
Some other friends gave her a uniform and some others gave her, you know, like books and everything. So she would come to office saying that I am going to social and she would actually come and wear a uniform and go to school, then come back to office with a change of uniform and go back to school like that.

00:22:42:04 – 00:23:18:16
Parul Sheth
She continued for a month or more. And then, you know, our team was saying that you can’t continue like this. You have to tell you cannot keep lying with the family. So then I talked to her and I asked her actually I knew that, you know, when she comes from a family where when she was a very young, she got engaged and because her fiancee was he did not study not this girl was not allowed to study further, but she already has done a crime of passion, 10th grade, which was already higher than average.

00:23:18:21 – 00:23:44:22
Parul Sheth
And now she cannot study anything more. So then I asked her, I don’t want to continue their education. She didn’t say anything. Oh, then I said, Do you think we have the you have the right to study? She said, Yes. Do you want to study? She said, yes, then. Then I said, You, you know about Gandhi’s study, you know what then do there is any pressure when there is any injustice, what would you do?

00:23:45:05 – 00:24:09:15
Parul Sheth
You said you will go on fast. I said, okay, you can also go on fast. Then I. Then she started like very puzzled. She looked at me, then she said, Look, like I said, but fasting is not easy. No. Once you take up, you can give up. So you know you can. I said fast. I said, we will all support you and the get, you know, getting convincing your parents.

00:24:10:02 – 00:24:31:03
Parul Sheth
Then she looked at me like she didn’t believe me. Then I said, But fasting is not easy. And I said, Have you ever remained hungry? She said, Yeah, sometimes, but not much. So then I said, Yeah, you can. Now you also, if you continue fasting, but you know what I said, if you die, I will be very happy.

00:24:31:14 – 00:24:55:04
Parul Sheth
And she was like looking at me like so puzzled and I said, you know, I will celebrate your date. I will tell the whole world that, you know, this girl wanted to study. And this entire what I did did not allow her to study. And so far, there are so many martyrs who died for so many reasons, but who will be the first martyr?

00:24:55:10 – 00:25:19:00
Parul Sheth
Who will die for education? So I will put your statue in middle of the holy city and say that this girl died because she wanted to study and and I said, because of that, you know, so many girls will get motivation. And she will they will also get started and I will celebrate it. So, you know, she was just I kept on saying like that and she kept on looking at me.

00:25:19:13 – 00:25:41:14
Parul Sheth
She didn’t say anything. She went home. She came back the next day with the uniform and said, I told my parents I’m going to continue my education. And then she finished at 12th grade. Then she was in the second year of. Then she took admission in the college externally, but but she went to college and then she was in the second year of college.

00:25:41:14 – 00:26:03:21
Parul Sheth
She got married to the same guy. Okay. Because there was no other choice for her. But she got married to the same guy. But Tutor told her in law that I’m going to continue my education. Then she completed a graduation, then she had a baby, and thereafter so started her post-graduation. And now she finished the masters. So children are Oh.

00:26:07:03 – 00:26:49:12
Philippa White
That’s great. That’s really great. Now, listen, we are going to be launching our what we have launched our TIDE Celebrated program. We’re in the middle of a program project right now, which we’re really excited about. And just for people who don’t know what it is, basically we’re connecting professionals around the world who are and we pulled together a team of people and they they work to support an organization like yours in order to obviously grow as individuals, to be able to push their brains and step out of their comfort zone and work with using their skills to support organizations in a way that they probably haven’t been able to before, but also impacting organizations like

00:26:49:12 – 00:26:57:00
Philippa White
yours. And so I just wanted to know what you hope to get out of this accelerator experience and how you hope we can.

00:26:57:06 – 00:27:22:14
Parul Sheth
So I’m going to share about the one very, very innovative and exciting project that we have launched recently. Not very recently, but yeah, competitively it’s very new and for that. And so I’ve got a Google image that we want to make the organization sustainable. So me and my husband are already making the succession plan and handed over to the next generation.

00:27:22:14 – 00:27:51:21
Parul Sheth
And for that we to make this organization more sustainable. We want to create of the whole process more system driven and also, you know, make the financially sustainable. So if we can get some fellows who can help us create those kind of strategies and yeah. And help us to, you know, make it more sustainable and also communicate what we are doing.

00:27:51:21 – 00:28:21:15
Parul Sheth
Sometimes what we do is really very valuable, but we don’t have that expertize and communication expert who can communicate effectively what we do. So if someone can help us frame it to to share this our impact of our work, to different stakeholders like individual donors, to companies, to foundations, to various level. So that would be a great support for us.

00:28:21:22 – 00:28:52:02
Philippa White
Great, great. Well, we are still working out exactly when it will be, but we will obviously let you know as soon as we know. But I’m really looking forward to working with all of you again. I as you know, I’m a big supporter of your work. So as we wrap this up, just because we’re getting to the end of the podcast, but before we do finish, I just wondered if you could tell our listeners what you’re working on at the moment that you think they would find interesting or that I haven’t asked you that.

00:28:52:02 – 00:28:52:11
Philippa White
Yeah.

00:28:52:11 – 00:29:21:07
Parul Sheth
So I is what I said, no less that I’ve been. We celebrated our Silver Jubilee and completed 25 years. We did a lot of introspection about what our major learnings and what do we want to take it like now take the next step forward. So we came up with this very innovative project, what we call our neck and neck is an Indian name and it means the people living in the forest.

00:29:22:05 – 00:29:50:07
Parul Sheth
So it is we want to work in the tribal areas with very marginalized communities of tribals and we want to create an open learning space where children are the ones who will decide what they want to learn, when they want to learn the best. They want to learn from whom they want to learn. And, you know, it will be really very selfish, self-designed learning model.

00:29:50:13 – 00:30:11:23
Parul Sheth
So that right now the way that all like the children are dependent on the schools and the teachers and the books and because in India that absent they can’t learn is it the learning is top but we want to create an alternative where children decide, do know, they learn the way we want to teach them how to learn and they will find a way to learn.

00:30:12:06 – 00:30:38:09
Parul Sheth
So that is one thing that we want to do. But also this whole place should be in very much environmental, eco friendly. And then there we will be like living. All of us will be living together, growing our food through organic farming, growing, cooking together, eating together, living together with social class in a manner where children will decide what they want to learn.

00:30:38:18 – 00:31:10:12
Parul Sheth
And also it will be like, you know, using all the appropriate technology, living very simple and sustainable life and providing them the vocational training so that they don’t have to work like a funeral in India, the time of pandemic or the situation of migrant worker that they have to walk so much and so many challenges. But if they find the appropriate employment and livelihood just in the villages and they’re living, how can they live more independent life?

00:31:11:03 – 00:31:37:18
Parul Sheth
So they are not pushed out of the villages? So we think that, you know, this for the career and the environmental situation, this could be the most viable alternative. And we feel it more and more strongly after the career experience that this is the most powerful alternative at the moment. So that is what we want to now develop and put all our energy in.

00:31:38:01 – 00:32:15:21
Parul Sheth
And for that we need the all the financial and other support. And secondly, when Falguni and I step back from the day to day working, we want to contribute our experience and learning to the wider child rights movement by sharing a lot of learning with other organizations, like minded organization, which are helping on the grassroots level and create this whole, you know, like this child’s movement and then participatory movement at the state and national level and create a cadre of grassroots child rights activists who can work with children.

00:32:16:08 – 00:32:37:11
Parul Sheth
So, you know, trained cadre of people who can do this work really passionately and comfortably. So that is what we want to do. And we want to put our energy in to for all of that. We need the support of, you know, the people from across the globe who are also passionate and committed with this idea. Good.

00:32:37:14 – 00:33:08:19
Philippa White
Well, I will put your website and contact details in the bio so that for anyone who is interested in learning more, they can get in touch. And hopefully this podcast gets out to more people that didn’t know about you before, but hopefully now do so. Thank you for joining us. Thank you so much for your time. And yeah, I’m so pleased that you guys are in our lives because I really do get so inspired every time I speak to you, girl.

00:33:09:14 – 00:33:26:13
Parul Sheth
So I’m feeling all my 25 for giving me this opportunity to connect with so many, so many people across the globe, an opportunity to get new friends and supporters.

00:33:26:13 – 00:33:29:01
Philippa White
Great. Listen, look forward to working with you guys.

00:33:29:07 – 00:33:35:13
Parul Sheth
We also look forward to. Thank you. Thank you so much.

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