Zambian street children, dance and Covid-19

Zambia, the challenges that the country is currently facing, and how this street children’s organization responded to Covid-19 are just a few of the things we talk about in this episode.

Barefeet Theatre is an extraordinary organization based in Zambia. Here I speak with Grace Tombozi Banda, the Executive Director.

You will be amazed at all of the incredible things they manage to do and how they truly transform people’s lives.

Grace’s story is humbling.

She tells us how the organization started.

How TIE impacted her life on a personal level.

We hear about the everyday challenges that Zambia is currently facing on a national level that people may not be aware of.

If you want a glimpse into life in another part of the world, then have a listen.

If Barefeet’s story resonates, and you’d like to support their important work, you can get in touch here. You can also follow them on Instagram here. Thanks for listening!

00:00:07:18 – 00:00:29:12
Philippa White
So the questions are these How can we really activate the best of the private sector to meet the challenges of the real world? Is there a way to accelerate my career that doesn’t involve boring online or classroom courses? And can I really impact people in the developing world with the skills that I have? Can I finally feel proud of what I know?

00:00:30:04 – 00:01:00:23
Philippa White
Those are the questions. And this podcast will give you the answers. My name is Philippa White and this is TIE Unearthed. Keep listening and you can follow us on our journey as we show you how we’re connecting the private sector with the social sector. To make change. Hello, everyone. Phillip Whyte here and welcome to Episode 11 of TIE’s Podcast.

00:01:01:05 – 00:01:08:12
Philippa White
Today I’m speaking with Grace Band CEO of Bare Feet Theater. It’s great to have you here with us today, Grace.

00:01:09:01 – 00:01:10:19
Grace Tombozi Banda
Thank you so much. It’s my pleasure.

00:01:11:10 – 00:01:36:07
Philippa White
So I’d love to tell our listeners a little bit more about you. Now, Grace was born in Lusaka, Zambia. She was the fifth child of seven and was raised by a strong single mother after her father died in a road accident when she was only five. Her father had two wives at the time of his death, which was very common in her culture and her stepmother with her four children.

00:01:36:08 – 00:02:04:22
Philippa White
And Grace’s mother and Grace’s brother and sisters all live together in the same house. Growing up in a family was not easy. And even though her mother was not educated herself, she encouraged a culture of reading and dreaming. This was not the norm as girls were not encouraged to read. Grace worked in a supermarket straight out of high school to make money, and that money went to help sponsor her brother to go to university.

00:02:05:09 – 00:02:33:02
Philippa White
The thinking was that if he was educated, he was going to be their savior. After four years of working six days a week for 12 hours a day, a well-wisher offered to sponsor Grace’s college tuition, where she then went off to study chartered accountancy. While studying, she volunteered with a girls orphanage and it was there that she met Adam McEwan, who is the co-founder and was at the time the artistic director of Bare Feet Theater.

00:02:34:05 – 00:02:55:05
Philippa White
The moment she got to know bare feet, she immediately fell in love. She started as a volunteer accountant and did that for five years. She then ran the performance company, which is generating wing of the organization. And finally, at the end of 2017, Grace was appointed as the new executive director for the organization. Their bare feet has grown organically.

00:02:55:20 – 00:03:29:01
Philippa White
It was founded by former street children and an Irishman who’s Adam, and they pride themselves on giving hope and a chance to the most vulnerable in their society. The majority of their facilitators, performers and management have come through their project, and they rely on support from volunteers from all walks of life to help them achieve their goals. Now, we have worked with their feet four times, I think since 2013, and the last project was actually just before COVID hit with Alice Walker from BBH.

00:03:29:13 – 00:03:37:15
Philippa White
So Grace, I wonder if you can tell our listeners just about you and the work that you do and the story of how and why the organization was set up.

00:03:37:22 – 00:04:01:05
Grace Tombozi Banda
All right. Thank you so much, PHILIPPa. So, so bare feet was started by chance. I would like to start by that. So it was Adam McGuigan who was that Irish guy? One of the founders. He was traveling through Africa doing his one man show when he was actually mugged in Zimbabwe. And the nearest Irish embassy was in Zambia.

00:04:02:02 – 00:04:29:13
Grace Tombozi Banda
So when he came to Zambia to get his papers sorted because everything had been stolen from him when he came to Zambia to get his papers stolen, assaulted, he he decided to spend some of his time while he was waiting for his papers to spend some of his time in one of what we call a drop in center side dropping center is a place where some of the street kids go to have a bath, to have a meal, but to go back to.

00:04:29:21 – 00:04:58:19
Grace Tombozi Banda
So these are like shelters where they’re just awesome meals and just a shout out to any of the kids that are living on the street. So Adam went there sometimes to do just starting work with some of the kids that were there at the time. Some of the guys that are also founders of DSP, we’re doing some workshops as well because they grew up at the center and then just finished the grade 12 or the high school through a sponsorship from the center.

00:04:58:19 – 00:05:15:15
Grace Tombozi Banda
So. So. Adam and this guy decided to do something with these kids and at the time it was an election year. So the focus was a lot of focus from politicians was from, you know, kids on the street day timebomb. There was a lot of theft and there was a lot of mugging as well from the kids from the street.

00:05:15:16 – 00:05:35:14
Grace Tombozi Banda
It was also a lot of kids. And at the time, that was in 2006. You know, the HIV pandemic also was at its peak. And a lot of parents had died, especially in Uganda. A lot of people a lot of parents had died beating, dying children because there was not so much education and sensitization around HIV and AIDS.

00:05:35:19 – 00:06:05:01
Grace Tombozi Banda
So there was a lot of young people on the street and politicians use that as an excuse just to talk about that and try to get themselves elected. So they decided to do a festival for that year. They decided to do get all the kids that were out in the streets really with the fountain of hope, which is the center that they used to go to the bring them to the fountain of hope and just started doing creative activities with them, creative workshops, dance workshops and different other things.

00:06:05:17 – 00:06:32:07
Grace Tombozi Banda
And the kids were so excited. And these guys, Adam and the other guys, decided, why don’t we have, like a big grand finale where we could, you know, these young people can to. And because it was an election year, every politician wanted to be seen on TV and this going to those always cameras following them so they that the guys decided to approach one of the politicians you know to ask them if the young people could perform for them.

00:06:32:07 – 00:06:54:02
Grace Tombozi Banda
So that’s kind of how it started. So they got a lot of attention. There’s a lot of media around it and there’s there’s also, you know, something good came out of it, too, because these young people actually get really interested in what that experience. So, you know, they just suddenly all the attention was on them that people were giving them attention.

00:06:54:02 – 00:07:20:09
Grace Tombozi Banda
People were willing to listen to what they were saying just because they were on stage. Usually on the street, you know, people don’t pay so much attention to them. They’re always ignored. So this was also a really life changing moment for these young people. And they decided this is the time that they wanted to do more, but that was not the time for these guys at the other at the time because they thought it was just going to be a one time thing.

00:07:21:07 – 00:07:46:08
Grace Tombozi Banda
And an organization called Project Consent International also not because they were also working with street kids at the time. So they decided to give them an opportunity to find them, see how many more other young people they can work with. There was a lot of centers at the time. There were a lot of orphanages as well in Lusaka, especially dealing with young people from the street or vulnerable kids from the society that had been orphaned.

00:07:47:11 – 00:08:11:08
Grace Tombozi Banda
So they decided to fund them, to do workshops, creative with these young people in the different communities. So that’s kind of how they started. Yeah. Yeah. And at the moment now we, we have we grew up too quickly, I think. I think a lot of people were so passionate. They were so excited about what was what it was doing.

00:08:11:08 – 00:08:30:09
Grace Tombozi Banda
And also, I think the fact that a lot of people in that grew up on the street themselves, they really understand. And they’re also very passionate about working with these young people on the streets. And that’s why it’s not so much about work. It’s also about trying to change lives. How can you test these young people’s lives? How can you give them the same opportunity that we had?

00:08:30:19 – 00:08:49:19
Grace Tombozi Banda
How can we make sure they also get a voice? How can we make sure we give them a voice, a platform, so that they can speak? Because on the streets, these young people do not have a voice. Only, you know, when we give them a platform to speak is when, you know, people can actually listen to them at the moment and we can five minute areas, we call them the five tools.

00:08:50:20 – 00:09:18:12
Grace Tombozi Banda
The first one is the outreach. So we go into the street, we go to the street, you go out into the communities where we outreach to these young people and invite them to the different workshops that we conduct, the creative workshops, or sometimes call them the intervention workshops. So that is the outreach. We make sure, you know, we also end their trust on the street to make sure that we learn their story, where they come from and also just, you know, be there for them and just be a friend.

00:09:19:11 – 00:09:45:17
Grace Tombozi Banda
The second tool is called the Workshops. So this is where we talk about different issues in the workshops, including psychosocial counseling as well as drug abuse, how to take of their bodies. These young people also experienced a lot of abuse on the street. And yeah, we we make sure they also learn when do you go when you have been abused, where do you go when your friend has been abused?

00:09:45:24 – 00:09:50:07
Grace Tombozi Banda
Who can you trust having a trusted adult and that. So that’s.

00:09:51:17 – 00:10:06:04
Philippa White
Amazing. So we’ve worked together a few times over the years. You know, is there from your experience to date with Ty, is there a story that stands out with regard to the impact of working with us?

00:10:06:22 – 00:10:35:16
Grace Tombozi Banda
And so I think there’s a lot of amazing stories. For me, I think the one thing that really comes to mind is when Cheryl Paul, who was in 2018, for me, that was around the time that there was a transition. And they asked me about from the previous CEO too, when the board was deciding who was going to take over the management.

00:10:35:16 – 00:10:59:07
Grace Tombozi Banda
At the time, I didn’t even really think I stood a chance or I didn’t even think that I, you know, this was for me. So working with Cheryl, she not only helped viewed, oh, help us with the strategy of the performance company. She not only help us view the organization as a whole and look at it in a different way.

00:10:59:11 – 00:11:24:09
Grace Tombozi Banda
But she also helped me as well in so many different ways, including, yes, she believed so much in me that I didn’t even really see it myself. I didn’t realize I had it. But she believes so much in me and she just stuck to me, spoke to, you know, she just spoke about how she thought had the potential and and how she thought.

00:11:24:09 – 00:11:48:08
Grace Tombozi Banda
I was a really good leader and at the time I didn’t really see it. I’m very passionate about my work. I’m very passionate about this. But at the time I didn’t even think that I had ever bility of leading an organization. So for me, that was a life changing moment. Yes, it was like it was me, but I think that was one of the times I realized wait while I can write.

00:11:49:07 – 00:12:12:02
Grace Tombozi Banda
And also and also she just helped me, can help me think things through, how I could think things through, how I can plan, how I can prepare a strategies and things. And I so she really brought that out in me. These other the other validity is just added on to it. But I think it started with each kid because she was the first that I work with.

00:12:12:08 – 00:12:13:09
Philippa White
That’s fantastic.

00:12:13:15 – 00:12:42:05
Grace Tombozi Banda
She did amazing work. All of them did an amazing work with organization and we have grown so much since then, but for me that really stands out, not to mention the lasting friendships that we created, these the volunteers that come here, it doesn’t end after the placement ends, it continues. Yeah. And because we also like to believe that we also touched their lives in one way or the other.

00:12:42:05 – 00:12:47:07
Grace Tombozi Banda
So, you know, we always keep in touch and now we have friends all over the world, so that’s amazing.

00:12:48:06 – 00:13:11:02
Philippa White
So yeah, well, it’s definitely reciprocated. So yes, you definitely do touch many of the people’s lives, all everyone’s lives who get involved and likewise ours. So absolutely. I’m glad for sure. Now, I wonder if you can tell tell us about challenges that you’re facing in your part of the world that perhaps we may not know.

00:13:12:12 – 00:13:48:21
Grace Tombozi Banda
So I’ll start with maybe Zambia as a whole. At the moment, I think I don’t know how much you’ve heard, but Zambia at the moment is the topic, especially in a lot of European countries, about the debt that we have. So at the moment, that’s one of the challenges that our economy is really going on. But, you know, a lot of things, especially basic needs, have become so expensive that it’s really hard for for for for a Zambian to afford to, you know, to leave, to eat every day.

00:13:48:21 – 00:14:12:24
Grace Tombozi Banda
So there’s a lot of poverty at the moment as a nation. There’s a lot of mismanagement of funds by our politicians at the moment. So it has been a really tough year to get closed. But just this year, the way our economy and how the kwacha is faring compared to the dollar is really bad at the moment. So everything has been hiked to, you know, more than 100%.

00:14:13:15 – 00:14:44:10
Grace Tombozi Banda
And it’s just become very difficult for, you know, especially local Zambians to do business because some of the goods and services have to be sourced from outside. And it’s very expensive for for the business at the moment. So the country’s needing a lot of money, which is not good, but also a lot of people lost their jobs, especially with the COVID 19, with the coming of the COVID 19 one.

00:14:44:16 – 00:15:11:21
Grace Tombozi Banda
A lot of South Africa, there’s a lot of South African businesses in Zambia for some reason, a lot of shopping malls that are owned by South Africans, a lot of companies, especially the South African. So after the COVID hit, even the South African themselves, since he’s closed down. So a lot of people have lost their jobs. A lot of even house keepers that are working in different people’s houses have lost jobs.

00:15:11:21 – 00:15:54:15
Grace Tombozi Banda
So it has been a very, very difficult year overall at the moment. I think in Zambia, because the levels of poverty are really bad. We didn’t experience the COVID 19 as much as I think other countries have and I think we have had 14, 14,000 cases so far and only about 114 did so. It I would like to say we are lucky in that area and of course, you know, if I can only imagine how bad it would have been if the disease affected this that much, because people at the moment, a lot of people at the moment can’t even afford to buy a mask.

00:15:55:02 – 00:16:18:01
Grace Tombozi Banda
A lot of people tend to be afford to stay in the house, you know, and, you know, just quarantine or just stay in the house, isolate because they rely on every day going out and looking for food and bringing their families to eat. So at the moment, I would say those are the biggest challenges that are experiencing in Zambia.

00:16:18:01 – 00:16:30:02
Philippa White
And actually from the point of view of COVID, because you’ve you’ve sort of brought that up and I’m quite keen to understand specifically bare feet how, how were you guys impacted by COVID?

00:16:30:16 – 00:16:57:19
Grace Tombozi Banda
Well, it was a very sad situation. First of all, with the kids that we work with, we work with a lot of vulnerable young people in the community, a lot of young people in the street and all of these kids. There’s a lot of politicizing as well around that because some politicians would announce on TV that the number of kids have been removed from the streets, have been taken to a center or where they can be safe.

00:16:57:19 – 00:17:27:12
Grace Tombozi Banda
But usually those were things that they would say and bring cameras. And as soon as the cameras left, the kids were taken back to the streets. So as obviously, because that is the those are the young people that we work with, that was a very challenging time for us. We did not have funding at the time to make sure that could tip because otherwise so what we did as it was also to come up with a donation page where we would raise some income to take some of these kids out of the streets.

00:17:27:12 – 00:17:52:08
Grace Tombozi Banda
So we did what we called an emergency camp. People came through for us. A lot of people donated whatever they could, and it was very overwhelming and encouraging for us and inspiring for us because a lot of people around the world were going through so many difficult times. But a lot of people also with the leader that they had donated and we had what we call an emergency camp where we took all the kids from the street.

00:17:52:17 – 00:18:14:04
Grace Tombozi Banda
And mind you, if you look at these young people are also on drugs. Most of them, you know, had become addicts. And also it was it was a very difficult time for us, even just having them to stay in that center, because some of them got away. We were putting our facilitators at risk. People are putting the kids at risk.

00:18:14:04 – 00:18:30:07
Grace Tombozi Banda
So it was a really tough time, but it was something that we really needed to do when we didn’t needed to take the kids out of the street, also at the street. On the street as well, because a lot of companies had that close at the time. You know, it’s also because they rely on begging on the streets to get food.

00:18:30:16 – 00:18:58:24
Grace Tombozi Banda
So there was really not so much for them. You know, not a lot of people to give. And another initiative that we have we had is a feeding program. So with the coming in of COVID 19, a lot of the centers that we work with, some of them orphanages, community schools, we work with, community churches. So these are the organizations and institutions that are already in the community.

00:18:59:05 – 00:19:22:14
Grace Tombozi Banda
We rely so much on partnering with these organizations that are already in those different communities that we work with so that the children that can easily access the premises. So a lot of these organizations, especially the orphanages that rely on a donation as well, could not afford to provide food, could not afford to provide anything for these young people.

00:19:22:14 – 00:19:40:11
Grace Tombozi Banda
And they were actually releasing them to go back to the street or to go back to their parents, some of them who, you know, especially for community schools, when they closed the kids were going back home and staying home. And most of these kids rely on food at school because some of this community schools provide meals to school.

00:19:40:17 – 00:20:16:24
Grace Tombozi Banda
So it was very hard as well. So we had to also see what we could do in that situation. I mean, the ideal situation was supporting all of them, but we could not even down salaries at the time. So we decided also, you know, to students through the same donation needs, we also started supporting one of the most vulnerable centers because that one, a lot of the kids to take the kids and they had the youngest kids, the kids could stay for money, you know, for days without having meals because there was really nothing that they could be given.

00:20:16:24 – 00:20:46:04
Grace Tombozi Banda
There was really nothing they could eat. So we also started asking people if they could contribute, even like, you know, extra food. We really didn’t have to give money. It didn’t have to be, you know, anything fancy. We just wanted people to contribute whatever it is and it could contribute. So sometimes we would go to drive to a shopping mall or, you know, and advertise on our page and ask people to drive through, especially, you know, and people give.

00:20:46:04 – 00:21:07:11
Grace Tombozi Banda
But sometimes when they’re going into the shopping mall or into the supermarket, they’ll come back with a bag of mail or, you know, to donate. So people came through, know, some people were giving money. And so we have been supporting decent as good a school children’s village where we have been supporting as well with at least two meals per day.

00:21:07:13 – 00:21:33:07
Grace Tombozi Banda
And this campaign also went really well because we had one of the international schools in Lusaka. It’s called the International School of Lusaka. They were supposed to have a reunion, a 20 year reunion this year, and they couldn’t. It’s because of the COVID 19. So they decided to ditch the next awards. That’s cool. Wow. So at the moment, we’re really happy to see that we are going to be sponsoring the center until December at least.

00:21:33:07 – 00:22:03:14
Grace Tombozi Banda
So a lot of people can go, that’s fantastic. Yeah. So like I said, it would have been great if we could support everyone, but at least we decided to go with the ones that were really hit the most. What challenges, especially with eating. And actually another initiative we did was to, you know, just help masks. So after a few months of being in lockdown and so they decided to open up the schools to some of the examination classes.

00:22:03:21 – 00:22:29:16
Grace Tombozi Banda
But the challenge was every child had to go to school with a mask, but a lot of the community schools that we work with could not even afford a mask. So so they ended up staying home on the way to school because every time you go to school without a mask, they’ll ask to go back. So what we did was also collaborated with an organization in Malawi that were making masks and they gave us 60,000 masks.

00:22:30:03 – 00:22:53:16
Grace Tombozi Banda
And we have been distributing mask as well to the most vulnerable community to the community schools, just to also make sure that they can also go back to school and continue the education. Right now, everything has been opened up. All the schools, all the classes have been opened up. So that’s another thing. So the 60,000 masks also, we’ve just been trying to make sure that the most vulnerable also can get in.

00:22:53:16 – 00:22:54:00
Grace Tombozi Banda
Most.

00:22:55:12 – 00:23:28:09
Philippa White
Yes, yeah. Wow. Gosh, you guys have been busy. And I mean, I just when I think back to when we finished the project with Alice and obviously this was just before COVID and you had closed your the business with the there was a few shopping centers that were wanting to contract you guys to perform, which was obviously a wear a way for bare feet to be able to generate income of course, and to be able to showcase your work, which is a big part of what you do.

00:23:29:04 – 00:24:04:06
Philippa White
And that’s obviously what also helps you be able to pay for everything else that you do and pay for people’s salaries and to support your important work. And of course, when COVID hit, you know, shopping centers were no longer open. And that money, it sounds like it’s coming, but it obviously everything got put on hold, which, of course, impacted you guys in a pretty big way just to I just would love you to talk a little bit about, you know, we’re about to launch, as you know, the accelerator program with bare feet, where we’re working at the moment with another organization.

00:24:04:06 – 00:24:19:22
Philippa White
But I’m super excited to be supporting your work. And and I just wanted to know, what do you hope to get out of this tie accelerator experience? How do you hope that we can help in the context of everything that we’ve been talking about?

00:24:21:03 – 00:25:03:15
Grace Tombozi Banda
Yeah, that was a very it was like a blow to us actually when COVID started, like you mentioned, we had a lot of things lined up. We’re really excited to be working in those areas and I think it was going to be a good year, but a lot of things just shut down without any notice. We’re really excited for the for the Time Accelerator because as you know Phillipa as well, I think also in other parts of the world we have to adapt to a new normal working that there were we used to we’re used to working the way we’re used to interacting with the audiences, the way we’re used to going to the communities

00:25:03:15 – 00:25:26:11
Grace Tombozi Banda
has to change. We have to think about the safety of the people. We have to think how can we now communicate with our audiences without having too much risk or put ourselves at risk? So we are really excited to see how we could use the you know, how we can use the different platforms to actually reach out to our audiences.

00:25:26:24 – 00:25:53:01
Grace Tombozi Banda
We’re hoping that we get supported, you know, how, how, how is it that we are the people are managing? How are the people managing to reach out to audiences without actually being there? Of course, for us, it’s it can’t be totally reliant on these other platforms. We also have to be there. We figure that out of how we can work with the different communities without actually putting them at risk.

00:25:53:08 – 00:26:16:21
Grace Tombozi Banda
But we also want to be able to reach out to the different audiences. One of our dreams is to make sure that we are self reliant. We are, you know, we don’t rely so much on donations, we don’t rely on grants and we just, you know, to be able to be sustainable and also just continue doing our work without having to worry where the income is coming from.

00:26:17:03 – 00:26:31:07
Grace Tombozi Banda
So that’s another word that we were hoping that’s the up. So there is often help with how we can strategy wise and how we can come up with new strategies, develop a new business plan for long term growth, and just beautiful love and ization in the life. Of course, to.

00:26:31:07 – 00:26:32:04
Philippa White
Be a fantastic.

00:26:32:04 – 00:26:34:20
Grace Tombozi Banda
Performance company. I think that. Yeah.

00:26:35:16 – 00:27:02:09
Philippa White
Good. Well, I look forward to it where we’re pulling the team together and we’re going to be kicking it off in February. So I yeah, 2021, we’re going to be working together again, which I’m really looking forward to. Yeah, me too. Me too. Now, listen, just to wrap things up, because we’re getting to the end of the the podcast, but I just wanted to as we finish, is there anything that you would like to tell our listeners that I didn’t ask you as we finish this?

00:27:02:10 – 00:27:31:24
Grace Tombozi Banda
Well, I guess we are always looking for new friends and barbecues followers. So we have been working on different programs at the moment. So as much as the COVID disrupted everything, we also quickly sort of other ways that you can get in touch with our audiences as well as the children. So at the moment, maybe I can just talk about what are some of the projects that we’re working on.

00:27:32:07 – 00:27:55:04
Grace Tombozi Banda
So we just launched what we call the International Day of No Shoes. It’s a campaign just as talking about the work that we do, the children that we have been working with. So and we also premiered a play that we did a while back, and I think it’s a lovely play and people can look it up on our YouTube channel.

00:27:55:12 – 00:28:20:16
Grace Tombozi Banda
It’s called Miss Mathematics. We have also been working on disability inclusion projects because a lot of young people will come to us. I mean, we want to see a lot of people with disabilities. That is not to say that I’m a bit, but that’s the hidden and there’s a lot of taboo around that. So we’ve also been working to include the young people with disabilities because we also feel like they fall under the bracket of vulnerable young people.

00:28:20:16 – 00:28:37:10
Grace Tombozi Banda
So we have also been working on disability projects and also we’re mostly launching, you know, online donations online so that, you know, if people can check out our website. Yeah. And those are some of the things.

00:28:37:15 – 00:28:58:09
Philippa White
Great. Well, what I’ll do is in the bio of our podcast, I’ll include some of those links that you’ve mentioned so that people can click on them and understand more about your really important work and support it. If if they can. So, Grace, listen, thank you. It is always such a pleasure to connect with you. I’m really looking forward to working with you yet again.

00:28:58:09 – 00:29:07:00
Philippa White
Thank in in February and just all the best to all of you. And please stay safe and and we’ll speak soon.

00:29:07:00 – 00:29:16:20
Grace Tombozi Banda
Thank you so much. And those who just want to say thank you for what time has been doing for us. Yeah, you’re great. You amazing. And we are really looking forward to next year as well. Thank you so much.

00:29:17:22 – 00:29:21:18
Philippa White
Amazing. Take care, Grace. Bye bye.

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